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Early math knowledge related to later achievement

Vanderbilt University – Joan Brasher

“A new longitudinal study conducted by Vanderbilt has found that children’s math knowledge in preschool is related to their later achievement—but not all types of math knowledge were related equally. The findings suggest that educators and school administrators should consider which areas of math study they shift attention to as they develop curricula for the early years.”(more)

Helping children achieve more in school

Medical X-Press – Staff Writer

“Not all children do well in school, despite being intellectually capable. Whilst parental relationships, motivation and self-concept all have a role to play, a recent study published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology shows that children’s learning strategy is key for academic success. The study showed that students with normal scores on intellectual tests but that have poor grades in secondary school are also not as good at acquiring and retaining information, or later applying it.”(more)

In the world’s biggest education test, one small country has raced past all the others

Quartz – Jenny Anderson and Amy X. Wang

“Every three years the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) tests 15-year-olds around the world on their math, science and reading abilities. Then, countries around the world celebrate, or panic. For example, in 2000, the world learned Finland was a global education superpower (that was news to many in Finland too, according to some). Somehow the country managed to start kids in school at 7, have short school days, assign little homework, test kids infrequently, and still eke out amazing results.”(more)

10 essential skills for today’s technology leader

E-School News – Keith Krueger

“Leading a school district in the digital age can be both exhilarating and formidable. Technology has proven to enhance the educational experience of students and educators, preparing everyone for success in the ultra-competitive, highly connected, ever-shrinking world. What core competencies do school system technology leaders exactly need to succeed? And what skills should a superintendent look for in his/her technology leader?.”(more)

Why America should care about its students’ lackluster performance on the global PISA tests

The Hechinger Report – Robert Rothman

“Once again, results from an international test show that U.S. students perform relatively poorly, and once again, critics say the results don’t matter and should be ignored. This would be a mistake. The results do matter, and American educators will lose out if they dismiss the findings so easily. By taking the results seriously, educators can examine the practices and policies of countries that do well on the test and see what they can do to improve practice in this country.”(more)

What America Can Learn About Smart Schools in Other Countries

The New York Times – Amanda Ripley

“Every three years, half a million 15-year-olds in 69 countries take a two-hour test designed to gauge their ability to think. Unlike other exams, the PISA, as it is known, does not assess what teenagers have memorized. Instead, it asks them to solve problems they haven’t seen before, to identify patterns that are not obvious and to make compelling written arguments. It tests the skills, in other words, that machines have not yet mastered.”(more)

How to Usher in a Wave of Entrepreneurship in Education

The Observer – Richard Hecker

“Our education system defines our future—it inspires us, teaches us, rears us, and has historically been the vehicle for upward mobility. It afforded the hope that with knowledge and hard work, a child from a family of limited means could climb into the middle, upper-middle, or upper economic class. But in recent years, education has failed us. Graduates are not getting jobs that match their education, thanks to a failure of our system to adequately inform students what jobs are available and provide the needed training. We have millions of job openings—mainly in high-tech fields such as computer science, math, and data science—which remain unfilled. According to a study by Inside Higher Ed, 49 percent of students feel they are underemployed.”(more)

Hidden calories on the KIDS menu: Study warns child-friendly restaurant options are packed full of excessive fat and sugar

The Daily Mail – Mia De Graaf

“The majority of kids’ menus have far more calories than they should, a new study warns. A child-friendly burger should never exceed 300 calories, while fries should be under 100 calories, and sides or salads under 150 calories. The whole meal should be comfortably within 600 calories. However, a new study by the RAND Corporation has found the average kids burger is 465 calories. Overall, a la carte items averaged 147 percent more calories than recommended by the expert panel. The damning news was published hours before a CDC report revealed we are struggling to control child obesity in the United States.”(more)

White House announces boost to computer science education

The Hill – Ali Breland

“The White House announced on Monday new initiatives to bolster computer science in K–12 education. Citing the rapidly expanding demand for technology jobs, the Obama administration outlined new efforts by two federal agencies: The National Science Foundation plans to spend $20 million on computer science education in 2017, on top the the $25 million it spent in 2016, with an emphasis on training teachers.”(more)

Real Parents, Real Talk About Kids And Screens

NPR – Elissa Nadworny and Anya Kamenetz

“We live in a world of screens. And in this digital age — with so many devices and distraction — it’s one of the things parents worry about most: How much time should their kids spend staring at their phones and computers? What’s the right balance between privacy and self-discovery? Research continues to provide some answers on how parents are navigating this world. Just today, for example, there’s a new study out that looks at nearly 2,000 parents — who have kids ages 8 to 18. Among the most surprising findings: People with children spend, on average, 9 hours and 22 minutes per day in front of a screen: texting, tweeting, Googling, checking the weather.”(more)