RSI Corporate - Licensing

What Works For Getting Kids to Enjoy Reading?

KQED News Mind/Shift – Staff Writer

“I said at the outset that our goal is simply to get kids reading—it’s reading, not positive attitudes toward reading that will make for better lexical representations and broader background knowledge. But then we saw that reading attitudes, reading self-image, and frequency of reading are interconnected. So in fact, getting kids to read will not only improve their reading, it will make them like reading more. Getting children to like reading more in order to prompt more reading is not our only option. We can reverse it—get them reading more, and that will improve reading attitudes and reading self-concept. Well then, how do we prompt a child with negative or indifferent attitudes toward reading to pick up a book?.”(more)

Later literacy success hinges on early handwriting lessons

Medical X-Press – Pepita Smyth

“A new study has shown the far-reaching implications of handwriting skills in early childhood. In an Australian first, Murdoch University researchers Dr Anabela Malpique, Dr Deborah Pino-Pasternak and PhD Candidate Debora Valcan examined the handwriting abilities of children prior to starting Year 1. “Writing is a way of transforming and expressing ideas into language and we know that early handwriting automaticity, that is how effortlessly students can write letters, is a strong predictor of both writing fluency and quality,” Dr Malpique said.”(more)

TEACHER VOICE: A little more conversation? Language and communication skills that make all the difference for kindergarten

The Hechinger Report – Devin Walsh

“Promoting good oral language and communication skills is perhaps the most important thing parents, caregivers and educators can do to prepare children to enter kindergarten. Having just completed my 17th year of teaching at Oak Grove Primary School in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, with over 800 students in kindergarten and first grade, I see children daily who have been exposed to models of good oral language. Sadly, I also see many who have not had these models and enter kindergarten at a disadvantage.”(more)

To turn around schools, first turn around the principals

E-School News – Mark Comanducci

“I oversee a portfolio of nine turnaround schools, all of which had an overall rating of F when ACCEL Schools first took them over two years ago. This means that, on average, fewer than 30 percent of students were proficient. As a charter organization in Ohio, our schools receive 40 percent to 60 percent less funding than traditional schools, because charters in Ohio rarely, if ever, get local funding. This means we don’t have the budget to radically restaff our schools. When we started with these schools, I faced a high level of skepticism among the principals. They had been bombarded with change for change’s sake, so their trust in leadership had eroded.”(more)

Chronic Absenteeism: An Old Problem in Search of New Answers

Education Next – Brian A. Jacob and Kelly Lovett

“A recent report by the U.S. Department of Education (USED) identifies “chronic absenteeism” as a hidden educational crisis. [1] In 2013-14, roughly 14 percent of students nationwide were chronically absent—defined as missing 10 percent or more of school days, excused or unexcused, which in most states would correspond to about 18 days of school missed each year. [2] In some cities, that rate is considerably higher, with Detroit topping the list at 57.3 percent of students chronically absent. [3] Absenteeism is not a new concern, however. Educators and local officials were focused on this issue as early as the late 19th century—a quarter of the juveniles jailed at the Chicago House of Correction in 1898 were there for truancy. [4] From Tom Sawyer to Ferris Bueller, truancy has been a staple of popular culture in the U.S.”(more)