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Ask 4 Questions to Choose an AP Physics Class

The U.S. News and World Report – Brian Witte

“Students considering an Advanced Placement course in physics have four options to choose from: AP Physics 1, AP Physics 2, AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism and AP Physics C: Mechanics. Each end-of-year exam – and potential college credit – corresponds to an AP class, but students may not know how to select the appropriate course and test. AP Physics 1, which is algebra-based, covers Newtonian mechanics, as well as the basics of circuits and mechanical waves. AP Physics 2, which is also algebra-based, continues with electricity and magnetism, fluids, optics and thermodynamics. Both classes and exams emphasize logic and reasoning with an overall goal of students understanding the core concepts of physics, although doing well requires basic algebra.”(more)

Build on AP, IB Exams to Prepare for College

The U.S. News and World Report – Sonya Ellis

“If you sat for an Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate exam this year, you have achieved an important milestone in your academic career. You may now be ready to take the summer off before college. But before you do, it is important to consider whether you are truly ready for college – and all that takes is a bit of self-reflection. AP and IB exams simulate the skills and content of entry-level university courses. Beyond the desire to earn a good score on these tests, you should be sure that you have fully mastered their challenges. A full college workload can be intimidating. As such, it is valuable to spend the summer before freshman year focusing on improving areas where your AP or IB performance may have slipped. Review your exams in these four subject areas.”(more)

4 Things We Don’t Know About AP Tests

NPR – Anya Kamenetz

“This week and next is a national rite of passage for stressed-out overachievers everywhere. Nearly 3 million high school students at 22,000 high schools will be sitting down to take their Advanced Placement exams. Created by the nonprofit College Board in the 1950s, AP is to other high school courses what Whole Foods is to other supermarkets: a mark of the aspirational, a promise of higher standards and, occasionally, a more expensive alternative.”(more)

This program could skyrocket AP scores

E-School News – Laura Ascione

“Participating in a specific college readiness program could cause a massive increase in qualifying Advanced Placement (AP) scores for students. Schools that complete the first year of the National Math and Science Initiative’s College Readiness Program see the number of qualifying Advanced Placement scores in math, science and English increase by an average of 67 percent, based on data from the College Board. The increase at NMSI-supported schools is more than 10 times the average annual increase.”(more)

College readiness program aims to boost AP scores

Ed Source – Theresa Harrington

“With less than a third of the combined students at two high schools scoring high enough to earn college credit on Advanced Placement tests in English, math and science, the Oakland Unified School District was a perfect candidate for a national program that aims to help students – especially low-income, African-American and Latino teens – improve their performance on AP tests.”(more)

Why placing students in difficult high school classes may increase college enrollment

The Hechinger Report – Sarah Butrymowicz

“Principal Lori Wyborney and her three assistant principals were gathered around a table covered with papers and Popeyes takeout at John R. Rogers High School, two weeks before graduation last spring. On the screen in front of them was a list of three dozen students administrators believed could succeed in an AP class. But the students were not yet scheduled to take one in the coming fall. One by one, the principals looked at each student’s profile, which included the student’s answers to district-wide survey questions about what worries them about AP classes, what subjects interest them and what adults they trust in the building.”(more)