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To foster a love of art in children, we must teach it at primary school

The Guardian – Emily Gopaul

“It’s no secret that arts subjects are increasingly being deprioritised in many schools, and that there’s a fall in the number of pupils taking arts subjects at GCSE. Yet the arts matter, not only to individual learning but to the UK as a whole: the creative industries currently contribute £84.1bn a year to the economy. Enthusiasm for art should really start at primary school – by the time students reach year seven, attitudes about what matters in education will have already been established.” (more)

Being Creative While Teaching Students About Therapeutic Effects of Crafting

Education World – Samantha DiMauro

“As rates of depression and anxiety among young people in America increase, it’s an important time to teach stress management skills. Getting creative with arts and crafts, especially ones that require extensive concentration and working with your hands (i.e. knitting), have been proven to have effects similar to meditation, and function as a natural antidepressant.”(more)

Arts Integration Unpacked

Education World – Staff Writer

“Arts integration is a teaching strategy that connects the arts with other disciplines to deepen learning in both subjects. “Students construct and demonstrate understanding through an art form. Students engage in a creative process which connects an art form and another subject and meets evolving objectives” (The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts). Arts integration is not a substitute or replacement for regular arts instruction. This strategy should mutually strengthen both non-arts and arts curricula and deepen learning in both disciplines.”(more)

How Making Art Helps Teens Better Understand Their Mental Health

KQED News Mind/Shift – Juli Fraga

“The benefits of art in a child’s education are widespread. Art can help kids express themselves and understand the world around them. Art is usually a hands-on experience and fun. For low-income students, studies have found that kids who have more arts education in school see long-term benefits by both academic and social standards. Tori Wardrip, an art teacher at Lewis and Clark Middle School in Billings, Montana, wanted to explore the benefits of art more deeply while addressing some of the mental health issues she saw students experiencing.”(more)

There’s Something Missing From STEM Learning

Education Week – Susan Riley

“The education field can always count on shifting priorities. Over the past 20 years, in an attempt to “fix” what many people dub a broken public school system, everyone from politicians to famous athletes to business moguls to education leaders has tried to find and repair the gaps in student achievement. But many educators are skeptical of new initiatives that come down the pike. Is a revamped approach really meant to help prepare children for the future, or is it just people outside of education sticking their noses where they don’t belong?.”(more)

How to improve the school results: not extra maths but music, loads of it

The Guardian – Josh Halliday

“Abiha Nasir, aged nine, walks quietly into the small classroom, takes a seat, adjusts her hijab and picks up the drumsticks. A shy smile spreads across her face as she begins to play. She was just five when she turned up at Feversham primary academy’s after-school clubs, leaving teachers astounded by her musical ability and how her confidence grew with an instrument in hand. Last year, Abiha successfully auditioned for Bradford’s gifted and talented music programme for primary school children, the first Muslim girl to do so. The assessor recorded only one word in her notes: “Wow!” Abiha’s teachers say her talent might have gone unspotted in many schools, where subjects such as music and art are being squeezed out by pressure to reach Sats targets and climb league tables.”(more)