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What Happens to Student Behavior When Schools Prioritize Art

KQED News Mind/Shift – Sir Ken Robinson and Lou Aronica

“There’s more room to make changes within the current education system than many people think. Schools operate as they do not because they have to but because they choose to. They don’t need to be that way; they can change and many do. Innovative schools everywhere are breaking the mold of convention to meet the best interests of their students, families, and communities. As well as great teachers, what they have in common is visionary leadership. They have principals who are willing to make the changes that are needed to promote the success of all their students, whatever their circumstances and talents. A creative principal with the right powers of leadership can take a failing school and turn it into a hot spot of innovation and inclusion that benefits everyone it touches.” (more)

Putting pen to paper: the schools nurturing a love of the written word

The Guardian – Naomi Larsson

“At Jenner Park Primary School in Barry, Wales, pupils between the ages of seven and nine are writing letters to residents of a local care home. The initiative sees children and their elderly pen pals exchange updates about their lives, helping to build relationships between generations while also giving the children an understanding of the value of writing letters by hand – an activity that’s becoming less and less common.” (more)

Arts-Focused Field Trips May Boost Standardized Test Scores, New Research Finds

Artsy – Eli Hill

“Most people would probably say enjoying a colorful Matisse painting at a museum is the polar opposite of filling in test bubbles using a grey 2H pencil. But new research backed by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA suggests that frequent art-related field trips by students may actually be a catalyst for significantly higher standardized test scores in both English and math. The surprising connection runs counter to previous studies, which found engaging with the arts had little to no impact on academic performance in other subjects. The recent research, directed by University of Arkansas professor Jay P. Greene, followed two groups of randomly selected 4th and 5th graders. Students in the first group took three field trips to the Woodruff Art Center in Atlanta, while those in the other group only attended one.” (more)

STEM vs. STEAM: How art enhances the STEM field

The Post Crescent – Andrew Dane

“Science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workers help drive U.S. competitiveness by generating new ideas and starting new companies. We hear a lot about the importance of STEM as it relates to preparing our kids to join the workforce. But what about the arts, and how should they fit into our educational system? The U.S. Department of Commerce defines STEM industries to include core occupations in the hard sciences, engineering and mathematics.” (more)

How important is the arts within STEM-centric education?

Study International – Louisa Kendal

“As we race towards a technologically advanced world, it is tempting for education to turn solely to engineering, coding and computer science. But, do the arts need space too? Programmers and tech gurus are bringing Artificial Intelligence (AI) into the mainstream, as its applications become more widespread and it naturally integrates with our everyday life. But, as attention to computer skills and technology intensifies, it seems the arts are slipping off the education radar.” (more)

To foster a love of art in children, we must teach it at primary school

The Guardian – Emily Gopaul

“It’s no secret that arts subjects are increasingly being deprioritised in many schools, and that there’s a fall in the number of pupils taking arts subjects at GCSE. Yet the arts matter, not only to individual learning but to the UK as a whole: the creative industries currently contribute £84.1bn a year to the economy. Enthusiasm for art should really start at primary school – by the time students reach year seven, attitudes about what matters in education will have already been established.” (more)