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Can parents’ tech obsessions contribute to a child’s bad behavior?

Medical X-Press – Staff Writer

“Fatigue. Hunger. Boredom. Those are often on the list of reasons parents mention if their child whines, has tantrums or acts out. Researchers are now asking if such negative behaviors could be related to something else: parents spending too much time on their smartphones or tablets. A small study from University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital and Illinois State University found that heavy digital technology use by parents could be associated with child behavior issues. The findings were published in the May 2017 online issue of Child Development.”(more)

Let your child learn about manipulation

News Herald – Juliann Talkington

Juliann

Manipulation is rampant in the digital age. It is easy for young people to be sucked into toxic personal relationships, political and social causes that are fronts for individuals and/or corporations that are attempting to gain power and money, and job situations where bosses or coworkers take advantage of them.

Most parents want to shelter their kids from these situations. Sheltering kids, however, may not be the best strategy. Instead it is better to empower kids, so they are not victims.

First, parents need to make sure their kids are confident, since it is harder for self-confident kids to be manipulated. Self-confidence is earned, not given, so is important to encourage children to explore many things and urge them to continue the activities that they enjoy and do well. In addition, it is essential that they learn the value of hard work. Also, it is imperative that the activities they selected are building self-confidence. Sometimes kids need to change activities as they grow to maintain healthy self-confidence.

The next step is to teach children how to identify a manipulative person, how to keep an emotional distance from such a person, and how to avoid personalization and self-blame. Then children need to learn how to turn the tables by asking probing questions and using time as a delay.

Finally parents need to allow controlled exposure. As counterintuitive as it sounds, kids need exposure to manipulators in safe environments, so they know when someone is trying to control them. In addition, kids need practice disarming a manipulator.

This means parents need to create learning opportunities. For example, a parent could consciously avoid speaking to school officials when a child’s classmate is “mean” on the playground, and instead help their child figure out how to handle situation him/herself. This playground practice should help prepare the child with more insidious manipulation that occurs when he/she is older.

As the child becomes more skilled at detecting and diverting manipulation, parents can gradually provide more exposure. By the time kids reach the teenage years, parents should expect them to discuss absences, homework, performance, and goals with coaches and teachers. In these conversations where will be many opportunities for the child to experience subtle and overt manipulation and to learn ways to remain in control.

Obviously there will be times parents have to step in, especially as when kids beginning interacting with adults, but parents should not be so protective that kids do not have an opportunity to learn.

Psychiatrists suggest administrators address students’ underlying perceptions in discipline

Education Dive – Roger Riddell

“Greater attention to the school-to-prison pipeline — a phenomenon that has seen a particularly disproportionate number of students of color funneled into the criminal justice system over minor infractions via “zero-tolerance” discipline policies — is resulting in a rethinking of approaches to student behavioral discipline. Approaches that have contributed to the pipeline ultimately haven’t addressed the underlying behavior, and class time lost as a result of related suspensions and expulsions have only contributed to recidivism and drop-out rates.”(more)

Behaviour is a national problem in schools in England, review finds

The Guardian – Jamie Grierson

“Schools have a national behaviour problem and there are “perverse incentives” for headteachers to paint their school in the best light, according to the government’s behaviour tsar. Poor conduct remains a significant issue for many schools in England, and there needs to be better ways available to help tackle the problem, Tom Bennett, who advises the government on behaviour issues, said in a report. In his review, Bennett also suggested there was a striking contrast between data gathered by Ofsted and school leaders on behaviour, and the experiences of classroom teachers.”(more)

Poor sleep in early childhood may lead to cognitive, behavioral problems in later years

Medical X-Press – Staff Writer

“A study led by a Massachusetts General Hospital pediatrician finds that children ages 3 to 7 who don’t get enough sleep are more likely to have problems with attention, emotional control and peer relationships in mid-childhood. Reported online in the journal Academic Pediatrics, the study found significant differences in the responses of parents and teachers to surveys regarding executive function – which includes attention, working memory, reasoning and problem solving—and behavioral problems in 7-year-old children depending on how much sleep they regularly received at younger ages.”(more)

A Dangerous Parenting Fad

The Huffington Post – Emma Jenner

“When you remind your child to use her manners, you’re not raising her to be compliant, you’re raising her to know how to carry herself in the world. Manners are not just about having a perfectly polite child; they raise the issue of respect versus entitlement. Take the playdate, for example. It’s not just a simple “thank you for having me,” it’s the child acknowledging that: 1) someone went out of their way to extend an invitation and open their home; 2) it’s not a given — they’re not entitled to the playdate; and 3) they are thankful.”(more)