Renascence School Education News - private school

Friday, January 30, 2015

Off to a Good Start in the New Year

Sentinel Source – Melanie Plenda

“As we shake off the holidays and get ready for a brand new year of possibilities, it’s a great time to get children off to a fresh start when it comes to wellness. Nutrition, fitness and even who their friends are can have a tremendous impact on the well-being of our children. With that in mind, here are some tips for setting them up for a great new year.”(more)

Tuesday, January 20, 2015

Feeling stressed? Involve your kids!

News Herald – Juliann Talkington

Juliann

The economy is weak and well paying jobs are scarce. Technology has changed the workplace and there is constant pressure to learn new things. In most cases, both parents have to work to meet financial obligations. This requirement means that most parents have to balance intense employment demands with childrearing responsibilities. As a result, it is not surprising that stress among parents is an epidemic and that there are record levels of depression, anxiety, heart disease, and diabetes.

 

Unfortunately, it is not just the health of the adult that has been impacted by the stress. Parental stress impacts kids. According to Dr. Christine Carter, a University of California Berkeley professor and author, after love and affection, the second most reliable predictor of a child’s well being is the ability of a parent to manage his/her own stress.

 

High stress has led some parents to adopt unhealthy parenting approaches. One of the most detrimental approaches is helicopter parenting.

 

Helicopter parents micromanage the lives of their children. Among other things, they ask teachers to change grades, talk to coaches when their child sits on the bench, write papers and conduct science experiments on their child’s behalf, apologize for poor behavior, ask for homework extensions for their child, and make excuses when their child is absent.

 

Even though most helicopter parents have good intentions, their parenting style can create long-term issues for children. Some of the negative consequences are:

 

Low self-confidence – Most children of helicopter parents are nervous about making decisions on their own, because they have not had the opportunity to develop proficiency in this area.

 

Poor coping skills – If a parent is always available to handle or prevent problems, children never learn how to handle disappointment and failure. As a result, the children of helicopter parents are often poorly equipped to deal with the regular stresses of life.

 

Sense of entitlement – Children who have had their lives adjusted by their parents become accustomed to always having their way. The world does not revolve around anyone, so these children often have difficulty adjusting to workplace expectations.

 

Inadequate life skills – Parents who always handle household tasks like preparing meals and cleaning bathrooms, after children are capable of handling the tasks, prevent their children from mastering these necessary life skills.

 

So when you are feeling overwhelmed, ask your kids to do more, not less. It will make you feel less stressed and prepare your children for adult life.

 

Saturday, December 27, 2014

Rwanda: How Can I Teach My Child Healthy Eating and Exercise Habits?

All Africa – Joyce Kirabo

“One thing we should acknowledge is that inculcating healthy eating and exercise habits into children is a complex task which requires an extra-ordinary level of commitment, patience and sacrifice in terms of time and money by the parent.”(more)

Tuesday, December 23, 2014

Success is more than talent and brilliance

News Herald – Juliann Talkington

Juliann

Brilliant, genius, gifted, talented, and connected are terms school administrators and coaches dread.

 

One would think these words would make life easier for people in leadership positions. Unfortunately, just the opposite is often true. Many kids with superior intelligence, exceptional talent, and economic privilege do not work hard, behave properly, prepare adequately, or make wise decisions.

 

Parenting a gifted or talented child is challenging. Children in this category acquire academic material and/or art or athletic skills quickly, which means they do not have to work as hard as other children to achieve the same results. Since less effort is required, these children can experience learning delays.

 

For example, highly intelligent students often have poor study skills, because they do not have to learn how to study. In addition, gifted athletes, artists, singers, students, etc. can develop a poor work ethic, because they do not have to work to achieve results.

 

In addition, gifted and talented children are often idolized. If they are not taught to be humble and respect others, they will not develop these critical life skills. Not only can they make it difficult for school administrators, teachers, and coaches to control a classroom or team, but they often struggle with humility and respect in the workplace after they graduate.

 

Parenting a child of privilege can lead to similar issues. Financially successful parents are generally well-connected problem solvers. These parents often continue in work mode when they arrive home. Instead of allowing their children to make mistakes and take responsibility for their blunders, they solve problems for them. Children in this situation often struggle with decision-making and can become lazy.

 

This means average kids have an advantage. With high expectations at home, it is easy for these children to see the correlation between hard work and success.

 

Parents with gifted, talented, and privileged children have a more challenging task. Gifted and talented kids need to experience challenging situations. They should be encouraged to take on activities that are challenging for them. This way they can see the benefits of preparation and hard work. Privileged kids need high expectations and to solve their own problems, so they can experience the challenges of the real world and learn how to make wise decisions.

 

Fortunately, average, gifted, talented, and privileged children can all be successful with the right expectations and direction at home.

 

Saturday, December 20, 2014

Giving kids ‘Choice’ makes school lunch successful (video)

USA Today – Staff Writer

“How Choicelunch is partnering with schools to bring kids healthier food they’re willing to eat.”(more)

Friday, December 19, 2014

Research: Don’t Buy Too Many Christmas Gifts for Kids

Education News – Kristin Decarr

“A new study from the University of Missouri and the University of Illinois at Chicago has found that parents who promote good behavior by offering material possessions could be setting up difficulties for their children later on in life. The authors of the study, “Material Parenting: How the Use of Goods in Parenting Fosters Materialism in the Next Generation,” discovered three parenting strategies that ended with greater materialism. Offering material possessions as a reward to children for something they should be doing, such as getting good grades; giving gifts to show affection; and taking away toys as a punishment.”(more)

Thursday, December 18, 2014

An Alternative To Suspension And Expulsion: ‘Circle Up!’

NPR – Eric Westervelt

“One by one, in a room just off the gym floor at Edna Brewer Middle School in Oakland, Calif., seventh-graders go on the interview hot seat. Some 80 students have applied to be “peer leaders” in the school’s new, alternative discipline program called “restorative justice.”…This school and the Oakland Unified School District are at the forefront of a new approach to school misconduct and discipline. Instead of suspending or expelling students who get into fights or act out, restorative justice seeks to resolve conflicts and build school community through talking and group dialogue.”(more)

Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Warning teens of hookah’s dangers is tough sell

USA Today – Robin Erb

“In particular, they’re trying to educate youth about the health risks of hookah — a practice that in a single session might subject that user to 100 times as much smoke as a single cigarette, according to some research.”(more)

Thursday, December 11, 2014

Seeds of learning: School uses garden to teach valuable lessons

Recordnet.com – Elizabeth Roberts

“A growing national movement incorporating gardening into the curriculum — and curriculum into the garden — is something of a passion for Principal Connor Sloan…Using the garden as a living classroom can do everything from broadening a student’s ability to connect the cycles and systems of nature to the sources of food to the nutritional connections between water and soil…It really helps infuse the process of inquiry, of asking questions, digging deeper…Studies have found that integrating gardening into the school day can boost test scores and student behavior.”(more)

Tuesday, December 9, 2014

Adverse childhood experiences impact child health, school outcomes

News Medical – Staff Writer

“Nearly half of all children in the United States are exposed to at least one social or family experience that can lead to traumatic stress and impact their healthy development – be it having their parents divorce, a parent die or living with someone who abuses alcohol or drugs – increasing the risk of negative long-term health consequences or of falling behind in school, suggests new research led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.”(more)