Renascence School Education News - private school

Friday, February 27, 2015

Life Is Taxing… Teaching Your Kids Real Financial Facts

Forbes – Neale Godfrey

“That time of year is upon us. Yes, it’s tax season! We always seem shocked by the fact that tax-time has crept up on us so unexpectedly. Nevertheless, Benjamin Franklin once reminded us that, “In this world nothing is sure but death and taxes.” Paying taxes is real and it is the law, according to the U.S. Constitution. Therefore, if you don’t pay, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has right to go after you or your estate to get what is owed… plus penalties… forever. Paying taxes is also a practice and, frankly, a habit that has to be built into any budget. It is never too early to start that discussion with the next generation, because if you don’t, they may get the wrong impression and feel that they are the victims, as if paying taxes is an injustice. We grumble about taxes this time of year and we need to be conscious of the affect that attitude has on our young children…Learning about money is learning about values, and one of those values is citizenship. Taxes help a country to pay its bills for the services that even rich people could not pay for on their own…The earlier you can start the conversation with the next generation, the easier it will be for them to embrace it, plan for it, and be honest about it.”(more)

Thursday, February 5, 2015

American Technical Training Fund: Creating a Strong Training Pipeline to Middle Class Jobs

Ed.gov – Johan Uvin

“…the President’s FY 2016 budget request includes a proposal to create a new $200 million American Technical Training Fund that would expand innovative, high-quality technical training programs that are aligned with the workforce needs of employers in high-demand industries. This new fund would enable the creation of 100 technical training centers across the country, modeled on the Tennessee Colleges of Applied Technology (TCAT), which have achieved impressive program completion and job placement rates with many non-traditional postsecondary students. The President’s proposal comes at a time when earning a college certificate or degree has never been more important. In fact, some level of postsecondary education or training has become a prerequisite for joining the middle class. Labor market projections show this trend is only going to increase.”(more)

Tuesday, February 3, 2015

Shrinking the Education Gap Would Boost the Economy, Study Says

Time – Kevin McSpadden

“Narrowing the education gap between America’s poor and wealthy school children could accelerate the economy and significantly increase government revenues, according to a new study. An improvement in the educational performance of the average student will result in “stronger, more broadly shared economic growth, which in turn raises national income and increases government revenue, providing the means by which to invest in improving our economic future,” says the Washington Center for Equitable Growth.”(more)

ESEA would see $2.7B increase under FY 2016 budget

E-School News – Staff Writer

“President Obama’s FY 2016 budget request includes four focus areas for education, including increasing equity and opportunity for all students; expanding high-quality early learning programs; supporting teachers and school leaders; and improving access, affordability and student outcomes in postsecondary education. Education Technology State Grants would receive $200 million to support models that use technology to help teachers improve instruction and personalize learning for students.”(more)

Closing schools not the answer to budget woes

The Star – Cathy Dandy

“Schools must close! This has been the cry for 18 years now as successive provincial governments continue to create a crisis in order to extract money from the education budget. School boards, easy targets because of some dysfunctional trustee antics, are attacked. “Under-enrolled! Inefficient use of resources!” cry the mandarins who developed the formula to measure school use. In these hard financial times, when the provincial government is facing billion-dollar deficits, these arguments might sound rational. But the funding formula that drives the provincial hand-wringing has two major flaws — there is no evidence to suggest the numbers are in the best interests of students, and the numbers ignore the fact that these schools are a community investment. The funding formula was created to pay for a certain number of square feet containing a teacher and 30 students and that’s it..”(more)

Monday, February 2, 2015

Testing Costs a Drop in the Bucket

Education Next – Matthew M. Chingos

“The cost of standardized tests, long assailed by testing critics as too high, has resurfaced in the debate over reauthorization of the No Child Left Behind Act currently underway in Congress. The National Education Association (NEA) has argued that funds spent on testing could be “better spent on high-quality early childhood education, health care, after-school programs, and support services.” Recently, the New Jersey Education Association released poll results indicating that a majority of voters and parents think that “too much money is spent on testing.” Testing critics usually point to estimates of total spending on assessments; a commonly cited figure—$1.7 billion spent by states each year—comes from a report I wrote in 2012. [1] But what these claims always miss is that, however calculated, spending on testing is barely a drop in the bucket of a public education system that spends over $600 billion per year.”(more)

Sunday, February 1, 2015

Good to see partnership of businesses, schools

Vegas INC – Glenn Christenson

“Wandering through the crowd at schools Superintendent Pat Skorkowsky’s State of the District address, I saw the business community becoming an active partner in addressing the needs of Southern Nevada’s K-12 education system. Skorkowsky made clear his appreciation of prominent business groups’ and individuals’ help in achievements made in the district’s Pledge of Achievement Program. A close working relationship between the business and education communities is crucial to prepare our children for success. This partnership has been a long time coming, and we are seeing benefits. Concepts that businesses support, such as return on investment and accountability, have become part of the dialogue, making it easier to communicate the district’s goals and strategies to the business community.”(more)

Financial Sense 201: Going Beyond the Classroom and Making Smart Financial Choices Now

The Huffington Post – Chris Mettler

“Tom Hanks said, “While I was (in college) I was exposed to this world that I didn’t know was possible.” College is definitely a time of discovery. We’re exposed to new ways of thinking and begin to form our own ideas about the world. Of course, it’s also a time for fun. College students are straddling the line between still being young and being faced with adult decisions. Straddling that line between teenager and adult can be difficult to manage for some students. College may be their first time away from home, which adds to the stress of managing a budget, paying bills and making decisions that will directly impact their future. For many, it is tempting to rack up debt now and worry about it later. College should be fun, but it’s also vital that students start thinking about their future and what life will be like after graduation.”(more)

Nation’s per-pupil K-12 funding fell for second consecutive year in 2012

The Washington Post – Emma Brown

“After more than a decade of increases in per-pupil funding for K-12 public schools, the nation’s per-pupil spending dropped in 2012 for the second year in a row, according to data released Thursday by the National Center for Education Statistics. Schools across the country spent an average of $10,667 per student in fiscal year 2012, a decline of 2.8 percent compared to the year before, adjusting for inflation. Thirty-seven states saw per-pupil expenditures decline at least 1 percent, and some states saw much larger slides. Per-pupil spending climbed steadily by at least 1 percent per year between 1996 and 2008, when the nation began to feel the effects of the recession. Spending flattened out between 2008 and 2010, and then in 2011 fell for the first time in 15 years.”(more)

Thursday, January 29, 2015

Nation’s per-pupil K-12 funding fell for second consecutive year in 2012

The Washington Post – Emma Brown

“After more than a decade of increases in per-pupil funding for K-12 public schools, the nation’s per-pupil spending dropped in 2012 for the second year in a row, according to data released Thursday by the National Center for Education Statistics…The downturn has come as federal stimulus funds dried up, shrinking the federal government’s aid to schools by more than 20 percent between 2011 and 2012. At the same time, many local governments saw their property tax base evaporate in the housing collapse and states wrestled with balancing recession-battered budgets…Cuts to education budgets have meant bigger class sizes and fewer programs in many schools; advocates argue that tight budgets have hobbled efforts to adjust to the new Common Core State Standards, expand access to pre-kindergarten and serve an increasingly needy student population.”(more)