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Longer hours on social media may increase teens’ risk of cyberbullying

Medical X-Press – Staff Writer

“Cyberbullying may be linked to higher use of social network sites by school children aged 14-17 years, rather than to simply having a social network profile, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Public Health, which examined data from several European countries. Researchers at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece found that school children in Romania, Germany and Poland were more likely to experience cyberbullying, such as aggressive and threatening messages, social exclusion, spreading rumors and sharing private, inappropriate or humiliating information, if they used social network sites for more than 2 hours a week day.” (more)

Tackling bullying could help reduce depression in autistic teens

Medical X-Press – Staff Writer

“Teenagers with difficulties in social communication, including autism have higher rates of depressive symptoms, especially if they are being bullied. Researchers at the University of Bristol, using questionnaire, clinic and genetic information on 6091 young people from the Children of the 90s longitudinal study, found that children with autism and those with autistic traits had more symptoms of depression when they were 10 years old than their peers and that this continued at least up to the age of 18.” (more)

Girls more likely to be bullied than boys, English schools survey finds

The Guardian – Richard Adams

“Girls are much more likely than boys to be bullied at school, with almost twice as many on the receiving end of cyberbullying and social exclusion by other pupils, according to a government study. The figures from a survey of 10,000 pupils at schools in England in year 11 – children aged 15 or 16 – revealed a decline in reports of bullying overall and particularly in incidents of violent bullying, which mainly affects boys.” (more)

Parents, Schools Step Up Efforts To Combat Food-Allergy Bullying

KQED News Mind/Shift – Tove Danovich

“Bullying takes many forms, but when it involves a food that triggers severe allergies, it could be potentially deadly. Once, when Brandon Williams, a 16-year-old from Kentucky, was on a trip with his bowling team, his teammate decided to eat some food from McDonald’s on Williams’ bed. One item had so much mayonnaise that it dripped onto Williams’ bed and jacket. But for Williams, who was diagnosed with a life-threatening egg allergy when he was one, it was a potentially dangerous situation. “I told the person not to eat on my bed,” Williams recalls. His teammate just smiled at him, then he shoved the mayonnaise-laden sandwich in Williams’ face.” (more)

It’s time to develop an anti-cyberbullying policy; here’s how

E-School News – Kaitlin Beckmann

“As technology continues to permeate our lives inside and outside the classroom, educators, administrators, and students should work together to prevent the development of a cyberbullying culture. Research indicates that cyberbullying is detrimental to students and, in some cases, has been proven to be the cause of self-harm and suicide. Educators and parents need to find ways to actively engage our students and make sure they feel safe in their school community.” (more)

When Teens Cyberbully Themselves

KQED News Mind/Shift – Juli Fraga

“During the stressful teen years, most adolescents experience emotional highs and lows, but for more than 20 percent of teenagers, their worries and sad feelings turn into something more serious, like anxiety or depression. Studies show that 13 percent to 18 percent of distressed teens physically injure themselves via cutting, burning or other forms of self-harm as a way to cope with their pain.” (more)