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How to Help Students Land the STEM Jobs of the Future

Ed Surge – Kelli Anderson

“For nearly 30 years, the global non-profit FIRST has been getting kids hooked on science and technology through hands-on robotics competitions featuring come-from-behind victories and breathless spectators clamoring for TV coverage. It all happens thanks to a network of corporate partnerships that let students peer into the real world of STEM careers while giving companies a chance to engage with ambitious and energetic students.” (more)

Kiwis be warned: the global jobs market demands polyglots

Stuff – Simon Draper

“The Asia New Zealand Foundation knows from our work with schools that children who are bilingual find it easier to acquire further languages and become multilingual. We have visited schools in Gisborne and Taranaki with children who are already bilingual in te reo and English. Their teachers have been struck by how easily these students have picked up Mandarin. Multilingualism is normal in much of the world, and young people lap up the opportunity to learn new languages if they are in the right environment. But here in New Zealand, the reality is that students are often forced to choose between te reo and another language when they are given choices. If New Zealand wants to raise global citizens, then students need to know where they stand in the world, and knowing who they are as New Zealanders is a fundamental part of that.” (more)

How to prepare students for the unknowable

E-School News – Adam Garry

“The workforce is on the cusp of a major evolution. But will Gen Z—those born after 1996 and just beginning to think about their careers—be prepared with the essential skills to succeed? Now more than ever before, educators have the opportunity and the imperative to engage students in learning tasks that ask them to think critically and problem-solve.” (more)

Can STEM Education Future-Proof the Manufacturing and Supply Chain Industries?

The Boss Magazine – Staff Writer

“Unless you live under a rock, you’ve heard mention of the skills gap in many industries. From IT departments and engineering to logistics, manufacturing, and construction, industry experts are getting older, retiring, and leaving a vacuum. But it’s not their fault. With the exception of IT, industries like manufacturing, construction, and trucking can be seen as unfavorable areas for careers—heavy or “dirty” industries, if you will. But it’s 2018, and technology is driving these markets to a new level of innovation.” (more)

What does the ‘future of work’ mean for schools? Big claims leave educators with more questions than answers

Chalk Beat – Matt Barnum

“U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos recently told the Wall Street Journal that schools need to change because by the time current kindergarteners reach the job market, 65 percent of jobs will be newly invented. The XQ Initiative to reinvent high school claims that the “jobs of tomorrow will look totally different than those of today or the recent past.” A special report in Education Week on the future of work says that “technological change, globalization, and climate instability are happening at an accelerating pace all across the world.” These warnings of dramatic change are increasingly being used to promote advocates’ favored solutions for improving schools, and the results are trickling down into real classrooms — not just through the expansion of established career and technical education programs, for example, but with calls to upend traditional schooling altogether.” (more)

Exclusive: New Survey Shows a Majority of Business Leaders Believe U.S. Education ‘on the Wrong Track,’ Many Fear Poorly Performing Schools Could Harm Their Industries

The 74 Million – Emmeline Zhao

“Cities and towns looking to grow their economies are likely misdirecting their efforts if their priorities are not centered on education, a new national survey of business leaders suggests. In canvassing 234 local business leaders on the state of their public schools and how they could be improved, Business Forward found that a majority believe that American K-12 schools are “on the wrong track” — and 1 in 4 are concerned that poorly performing schools will negatively impact their businesses.” (more)