Renascence School Education News - private school

Thursday, March 26, 2015

STEM subjects boost girls’ earnings by a third, study says

Teaching Personnel – Charlotte Michaels

“Studying maths or science at A-level can boost girls’ earnings by as much a third, according to a new report. The research reveals that the returns for women who study two or more A-levels in science, technology, engineering or maths (STEM) subjects are 33.1 per cent when compared to those who only obtain GCSE-level qualifications…Encouraging more girls to study STEM subjects has been part of the coalition’s education plan since 2010, resulting in 10,000 more STEM A-level entries for female pupils.”(more)

Sunday, March 22, 2015

Money, dream jobs, a better brain: why everyone should learn a second language

The Next Web – Kayla Matthews

“With more online learning resources available than we know what to do with, there’s really no reason for you to not know a second language. Being bilingual not only gives you some fun bragging rights, but it also makes you stand out in the increasingly competitive job market. Learning another language can pave the way for salary increases and open up tons of amazing job opportunities that would be far beyond reach for someone who only knows one language. But it doesn’t stop there. Did you know it can help keep your brain healthy, for longer? If you’ve ever considered learning a second language, below are just some of the many reasons why you should finally commit to becoming bilingual.”(more)

Saturday, March 14, 2015

10 steps to making yours a STEM school

E-School News – Stephen Noonoo

“The quest to improve the way schools team STEM subjects, such as engineering and computer science, isn’t an easy fix. New resources, technology, and teacher training all play a significant part. Recently, school administrators shared how they were tackling the problem at the elementary level, using professional development courses from the National Center for STEM Elementary Education at St. Catherine University in Minnesota. To help other schools, the NCSEE has also come up with a ten-point tip sheet for schools looking to beef up their commitment to STEM. “The thing that’s most universally true is that schools and teachers are so full of opportunities to teach STEM. There’s so much right there already,” said Patty Born-Selly, the executive director of the NCSEE. “What we’ve found across the board is that teachers really want to be more comfortable with this material and the subject matter so they feel as comfortable with it as, say, reading.” Among the organization’s suggestions: be realistic, involve local professionals from the community, survey local outdoor areas, and take time to celebrate STEM successes in a way that joins together the entire school. Read on for the NCSEE’s full suggestions.”(more)

It depends what you study, not where

The Economist – Staff Writer

“A new report from PayScale, a research firm, calculates the returns to a college degree. Its authors compare the career earnings of graduates with the present-day cost of a degree at their alma maters, net of financial aid. College is usually worth it, but not always, it transpires. And what you study matters far more than where you study it.”(more)

Friday, March 13, 2015

The importance of deepening and widening the way we teach writing

SmartBlog on Education – Jim Cunningham

“Writing instruction is transitioning. Common Core has set new standards for the writing skills students need to master in order to be college and career ready…With the Common Core, we are asking students to write about what they are learning—literature, science, and current events, for example…They now have to formulate arguments and support those with reasoning and evidence based on what they are reading. It is this type of writing that is new for teachers and students in the elementary and middle grades.”(more)

Wednesday, March 11, 2015

No, Science Isn’t ‘A Boy Thing.’ And These Genius Girls Prove It

The Huffington Post – Robbie Couch

“Science isn’t just for one gender — just ask the girls in Microsoft’s new ad. Despite their young ages, they all have impressive scientific accomplishments under their belts. But they also admit that society hasn’t created a world where their academic interest is easily accessible for students like them…Microsoft’s ad — which was launched in honor of International Women’s Day on Sunday — addresses the gender gap when it comes to students pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). According to the ad, seven out of 10 girls are interested in science, but only two out of 10 will pursue a career in a related field.”(more)

Sunday, March 8, 2015

Study a foreign language, get a job

The Badger Herald – Dara Brody

“In an era notorious for a competitive job-hunting climate, the skills we learn in our years at the University of Wisconsin are vital in ensuring a successful career. So when scouring the course guide trying to make up your next semester schedule, a foreign language class can be one of the most helpful things to add to your calendar. As cited by the Association of American Colleges & Universities, one of the top ten skills employers look for in a college graduate is the ability to understand the global context in which work is now performed. As the world becomes more interconnected and borders seem to melt away amidst advancing technology, employees with language skills become extremely important in supporting business endeavors both at home and abroad. Learning a language also correlates with cultural awareness, a valuable skill in any diverse workplace environment. Additionally, research by the National Research Council found those who studied a foreign language better understood English grammar and had improved overall communication and problem solving skills. These are imperative in any career.”(more)

Friday, March 6, 2015

The Digital Skills Divide

Inside Higher Ed – Ashley A. Smith

“Colleges can bridge the “middle skills” career gap by offering more courses focused on digital skills, a new report suggests. Those careers in the middle require a high school diploma, but not a bachelor’s degree. In 2012, 54 percent of all U.S. jobs were middle skill, according to an analysis of Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Employment Statistics by the National Skills Coalition…The report also found digitally intensive jobs have grown two and a half times faster than have jobs that do not require digital skills. Those occupations that require digital skills pay 18 percent more than those jobs that do not…community colleges could fill that void by making sure their students have all the skills — including technology skills — needed for those careers.”(more)

Thursday, March 5, 2015

Study a foreign language, get a job

The Badger Herald – Dara Brody

“As cited by the Association of American Colleges & Universities, one of the top ten skills employers look for in a college graduate is the ability to understand the global context in which work is now performed. As the world becomes more interconnected and borders seem to melt away amidst advancing technology, employees with language skills become extremely important in supporting business endeavors both at home and abroad. Learning a language also correlates with cultural awareness, a valuable skill in any diverse workplace environment. Additionally, research by the National Research Council found those who studied a foreign language better understood English grammar and had improved overall communication and problem solving skills. These are imperative in any career. If you’re still not convinced, in a 2004 survey of hundreds of alumni, The American Graduate School of International Management in Glendale, Arizona, most respondents reported their language study to be a critical factor in their own hiring decisions and a skill that greatly enhanced their career paths.”(more)

International exams show persistent achievement gaps between boys and girls

The Washington Post – Emma Brown

“International math, science and reading exams show that across dozens of countries, 15-year-old boys are more likely to be low achievers than 15-year-old girls, especially in reading. But among the highest-performing students, girls trail boys, and girls have far less confidence in their ability to solve math problems…“Low-achieving boys appear to be trapped in a cycle of poor performance, low motivation, disengagement with school and lack of ambition, while high-achieving girls are somehow thwarted from using their mathematical skills in more specialised higher education and, ultimately, in their careers,” the report says…“These results strongly suggest that gender gaps in school performance are not determined by innate differences in ability,” the report says, calling on parents, teachers and policy makers to help identify and change social factors that contribute to the gender gaps.”(more)