RSI Corporate - Licensing

How Mindfulness and Storytelling Help Kids Heal and Learn

KQED News Mind/Shift – Juli Fraga

“When mindfulness teacher Laurie Grossman instructed a class at Reach Academy to let their eyes rest and close so they could focus on their breathing, one student’s eyes remained wide open. Instead of following Grossman’s cues, the student refused to close her eyes and stared at her friend. This kind of response is not unusual for students who come to school after having experienced trauma, such as the death of a parent, emotional neglect and homelessness. Neurological research shows that tragic experiences can affect brain development and impact a child’s ability to concentrate and relax. As a result, students who grow up in these circumstances believe that it’s important to always keep a watchful eye on their surroundings.”(more)

Children’s literacy linked to healthy eating

Nursery World – Kathryn Ingham

“The research published in the European Journal of Nutrition, followed 161 children in Finland aged between six and eight. The quality of their diet was analysed using food diaries and evaluated according to Finnish nutritional recommendations. The closer a child’s eating habits were to the Baltic Sea Diet – high in fruit, vegetables, wholegrains, fish and low fat milk, and low in sugar, saturated fats and red meat – the healthier it was considered. The study shows that children with higher quality diets perform better in standardised tests measuring reading, fluency and comprehension, when compared to children whose diets are low in nutritional value.”(more)

How kids can benefit from boredom

Medical X-Press – Teresa Belton

“From books, arts and sports classes to iPads and television, many parents do everything in their power to entertain and educate their children. But what would happen if children were just left to be bored from time to time? How would it affect their development? I began to think about boredom and children when I was researching the influence of television on children’s storytelling in the 1990s. Surprised at the lack of imagination in many of the hundreds of stories I read by ten to 12 year-old children in five different Norfolk schools, I wondered if this might partly be an effect of TV viewing. Findings of earlier research had revealed that television does indeed reduce children’s imaginative capacities.”(more)

Nine of ten US teens don’t get enough exercise

Medical X-Press – Amy Norton

“Over 90 percent of U.S. high school students don’t get enough exercise to stay fit and healthy, and the pattern persists after they graduate, a new study finds. The researchers followed students at 44 high schools for four years, and found that only 9 percent met current exercise recommendations throughout that time. For the most part, those habits held steady after high school—though college students were more active than non-students. There was also some variation among college kids, the study found: Those who lived on campus exercised more than those who lived at home. It’s not clear why those students were more active. They might have been more involved in sports, for example, or simply walked more—running from classes to dorms and other campus buildings, said lead researcher Kaigang Li.”(more)

5 reasons girls don’t pursue technology-related careers

E-School News – Laura Devaney

“Exposing girls to technology early, along with having parents and role models support girls’ interest in technology-related hobbies and career paths, can help encourage more girls to pursue technology in and after college, according to data from CompTIA, a nonprofit association for the technology industry. More than 5.1 million people worked in core technology jobs in the U.S. at the end of 2015, but just 25 percent of those jobs were held by women. CompTIA-commissioned research, based on a survey and focus groups of girls between the ages of 10 and 17, identifies several critical factors that discourage girls from considering careers in tech.”(more)

What does a flipped classroom look like at each grade level?

E-School News – Aaron Sams and Justin Aglio

“Although the term “flipped learning” is almost universally recognized, teachers apply it in many forms, in all grades levels, and in various school environments. If you are a teacher using flipped learning, the chances are that you share some similarities with other teachers who flip—as well as some differences. However, the major commonality among all flipped learning teachers is that every one of them is creating personal learning experiences for each student. We asked three flipped teachers — one from an elementary school, one from a junior high, and one from a high school — to describe what learning looks like in their world.”(more)