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Mandarin is now rapidly becoming a global language

China Daily – Staff Writer

“A recent survey by the British Council, the United Kingdom’s international organization for cultural relations and educational opportunities, shows Chinese has become the language that British parents want their children to learn most, and is considered “the most useful language for the future”. Statistics from the American Councils for International Education show the number of students learning Chinese at primary and middle schools in the US doubled between 2009 and 2015.”(more)

The Asian century is gaining momentum: universities must prepare

The Guardian – Matt Durnin

“Amidst the handwringing over the effect of Brexit on the UK’s universities, we need to contemplate our place in a future global economy driven by technology and innovation. From where will the most important discoveries of the coming decades emerge? Which countries and cities will give birth to the technologies, cures and ideas that will shape our future? China spends five times that of the UK on R&D each year. For universities hoping to build or maintain their position as global leaders in innovation and enterprise, China is hard to overlook as an option.”(more)

Embracing Chinese Language Week makes business sense

Stuff – ANUJA NADKARNI

“Learning the language is the first step for businesses that want to become China-ready, businesswoman Jo Coughlan says. China is New Zealand’s second-largest trading partner, its biggest market for export goods, a fast-growing service market and an increasingly major source of foreign investment. Coughlan heads New Zealand Chinese Language Week. During the week, it will run a social media campaign teaching five Mandarin phrases through social videos. Coughlan is also director of agribusiness Silvereye and said, as a business owner, she recognised the opportunities, challenges and complexities of the Chinese market.”(more)

The 1 Language That CEOs Must Learn to Get Ahead

INC – Melanie Curtin

“If you’re looking to expand your linguistic horizons while simultaneously setting yourself up for professional success, there’s one language that vastly outpaces the rest in terms of its utility. As Emily Oster, associate professor of economics at Brown University, says, “Mandarin would be the best choice.” “This is the native language for 14 percent of the world’s population,” she explains, “and most of those people do not speak English, so it’s all a win.” It’s definitely a win, considering over one billion people speak it worldwide already, and China is slated to become the number one economic power on the planet by 2020.”(more)

Learning Chinese now more appealing to youngsters worldwide

The GB Times – Chi Dehua

“This summer, 145 representatives from 112 countries arrived in China to participate in the annual Chinese language competition: the Chinese Bridge. They were selected from regional contests based on their proficiency in the language and insight into the country’s culture. In addition to enjoying the needle of competition, contestants were given the opportunity to tour the country’s renowned scenic spots and visit tech companies during their one-month stay. The overall winners were also offered full scholarships by the Confucius Institute’s headquarters so that they could return to China and further their studies. The large-scale event echoed the ‘Chinese fever’ phenomenon currently sweeping the globe. According to the Xinhua News Agency, the number of foreigners learning Chinese has grown from 30 million in 2005 to 100 million currently, with more than 60 countries now offering Chinese as part of their national education system.”(more)

China Focus: Deciphering the Shanghai math myths

Xinhua – You Zhixin, Zheng Kaijun, and Wu Zhendong

“The English version of a popular set of Shanghai math books debuted at the Shanghai Book Fair and attracted a great number of interested Chinese readers. Chinese publishers and scholars are inspired by the introduction of Shanghai math books to the UK and they are bringing back the fruit of such exchanges back to Shanghai. While in Britain, pupils may need to sharpen their pencils in preparation to do math “the Shanghai way.”(more)