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The Asian century is gaining momentum: universities must prepare

The Guardian – Matt Durnin

“Amidst the handwringing over the effect of Brexit on the UK’s universities, we need to contemplate our place in a future global economy driven by technology and innovation. From where will the most important discoveries of the coming decades emerge? Which countries and cities will give birth to the technologies, cures and ideas that will shape our future? China spends five times that of the UK on R&D each year. For universities hoping to build or maintain their position as global leaders in innovation and enterprise, China is hard to overlook as an option.”(more)

Embracing Chinese Language Week makes business sense

Stuff – ANUJA NADKARNI

“Learning the language is the first step for businesses that want to become China-ready, businesswoman Jo Coughlan says. China is New Zealand’s second-largest trading partner, its biggest market for export goods, a fast-growing service market and an increasingly major source of foreign investment. Coughlan heads New Zealand Chinese Language Week. During the week, it will run a social media campaign teaching five Mandarin phrases through social videos. Coughlan is also director of agribusiness Silvereye and said, as a business owner, she recognised the opportunities, challenges and complexities of the Chinese market.”(more)

Surge in number of students learning Chinese Mandarin

Stuff – Ruby McAndrew

“Each week, Li Ling Ho organises more than 20 Mandarin language classes and story time sessions, many of which are full to the brim with toddlers and schoolchildren learning the world’s most spoken language. Ho founded Ni Hao Children’s Community, a charitable organisation in Wellington, just over two years ago as a way to teach Chinese Mandarin in a fun way. With the number of participants on the up, it appears to have struck a chord. “So far, even just as a start up, people are really interested and keep asking us to start classes in different suburbs,” Ho said.”(more)

Chinese children crush Americans in math thanks to a mindset Americans only display in one place: sports

Business Insider – Libby Kane

“For the most part, American children aren’t great at math. But Chinese children tend to be excellent. Testing half a million students worldwide, the Program for International Student Assessment is one of the most widely cited measurements of global education, and it’s consistently found Chinese students at the top of the academic pile … and Americans much nearer the bottom. Some experts argue that the PISA assessment, like any standardized tests, primarily measures a student’s ability to take the test, not their knowledge, but hardly anyone disputes that the American education has some work to do when it comes to math.”(more)

The 1 Language That CEOs Must Learn to Get Ahead

INC – Melanie Curtin

“If you’re looking to expand your linguistic horizons while simultaneously setting yourself up for professional success, there’s one language that vastly outpaces the rest in terms of its utility. As Emily Oster, associate professor of economics at Brown University, says, “Mandarin would be the best choice.” “This is the native language for 14 percent of the world’s population,” she explains, “and most of those people do not speak English, so it’s all a win.” It’s definitely a win, considering over one billion people speak it worldwide already, and China is slated to become the number one economic power on the planet by 2020.”(more)

Who learns foreign language better—introverts or extraverts?

Phys.Org – Staff Writer

“Extravert Chinese students learning English as a second language are likely to perform better in speaking and reading, but less proficient in listening than their introvert counterparts, according to a study published in Pertanika Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities (JSSH). In Chinese culture, students are expected to listen to their teachers attentively, as opposed to Western culture where class participation is encouraged. The Chinese culture is influenced by Confucian values, including collectivism, socialisation for achievement, and high acceptance of power and authority. Some studies have suggested that such introversion hinders Chinese students’ ability to learn English as a second language.”(more)