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4 Steps to Funding an Education

Kiplinger – Jan Blakeley Holman, CFP

“As Americans, we have the freedom to explore opportunities and pursue our goals; the sky is the limit. Our belief in endless possibilities is particularly true when it comes to educating our children. Every generation wants to provide their kids with more years of school and a higher-quality education than they received. That’s because we believe that a good education is necessary for a better life. In fact, on average, a college degree will result in higher earnings. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, an individual with a bachelor’s degree or higher is typically expected to earn 67.7% more than an individual with only a high school degree.”(more)

“Shark Tank” in the Classroom

The Huffington Post – John M. Eger

“The formula seems simple. It’s having a class -divided into groups-brainstorm the best way, indeed all the ways, to tackle Innovations in new media including apps for the smart phone etc. Shark Tank in the classroom is the brainchild of Dr. Noah Arceneaux who has been teaching a course on “Creative Uses of Emerging Media” for a number of years but decided to have the students explore ideas for new innovations; and then, after a period on research, interviews and contemplation, have them present their business plans in writing and defend them orally where the best will be chosen.”(more)

How One University Used Big Data To Boost Graduation Rates

NPR – Anya Kamenetz

“Whenever you surf the web, sophisticated algorithms are tracking where you go, comparing you with millions of other people. They’re trying to predict what you’ll do next: Apply for a credit card? Book a family vacation? At least 40 percent of universities report that they’re trying some version of the same technology on their students, according to several recent surveys. It’s known as predictive analytics, and it can be used to either help or hurt students, says a new report from the New America Foundation.”(more)

Personalized learning: How kids are getting into college by mastering their skills

The Hechinger Report – Brian Stack

“A student-centered personalized-learning model known as competency education has gained traction over the past five years as states have developed policies to promote its adoption in both elementary and secondary schools. Born from the notion that the old system has significant limitations and flaws in both its structure and its execution in the schools of today, competency education uses a student’s ability to transfer knowledge and apply skills to organize learning. Students refine these skills based on goal-setting, ungraded feedback known as the formative assessment. When they are ready, the students demonstrate their understanding by performing thoughtfully developed tasks that determine how much learning has taken place. This evaluation is called the summative assessment.”(more)

Raising More Than Test Scores

Education Next – Matthew Davis and Blake Heller

“Strict attention to detail, long school days, and a singular focus on college are the hallmarks of “no excuses” charter schools. Families in cities across the United States have flocked to them as academic game changers, and research shows that many of their students beat the odds on standardized tests. But critics allege that such gains are hollow. The “no excuses” approach, they say, amounts to a paternalistic culture of test preparation that detracts from real learning and comes at a steep cost to social and emotional health. Successfully navigating adult life, including the risks and rigors of college, will take much more.”(more)

Borsuk: Too many students unprepared for college

USA Today – Alan J. Borsuk

“About a dozen years ago, Willie Jude, a longtime Milwaukee Public Schools administrator who was principal of Custer High School at the time, told me that many Custer grads who went on to higher education (and there weren’t that many) realized quickly they were way behind many other students when it came to academic preparation. That’s because those other kids were learning the B and C parts of the book when you were learning the A part, Jude said he told them. In other words, a lot of freshmen hit college with a high school diploma that says they are more likely to succeed than students with other diplomas. The difference breaks strongly along lines of income and race.”(more)