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Should high schools focus on offering college experience over college prep?

Education Dive – Tara García Mathewson

“The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s Early College High School Initiative has supported the creation or redesign of nearly 300 schools that serve more than 80,000 students in 31 states and the District of Columbia since 2002. Even more schools and districts have taken on this early college high school design challenge outside the auspices of the Gates Foundation. The exact design of these schools varies based on partnerships between schools and local colleges, but the foundational concept is that students can graduate from high school with a college credential as well..”(more)

Why placing students in difficult high school classes may increase college enrollment

The Hechinger Report – Sarah Butrymowicz

“Principal Lori Wyborney and her three assistant principals were gathered around a table covered with papers and Popeyes takeout at John R. Rogers High School, two weeks before graduation last spring. On the screen in front of them was a list of three dozen students administrators believed could succeed in an AP class. But the students were not yet scheduled to take one in the coming fall. One by one, the principals looked at each student’s profile, which included the student’s answers to district-wide survey questions about what worries them about AP classes, what subjects interest them and what adults they trust in the building.”(more)

Borsuk: Students speaking the language of college success

USA Today – Alan J. Borsuk

“There has been controversy in recent years about the vocabulary questions on college admissions tests. The SAT tests were criticized for using words that no one uses in real life, so there were changes aimed at making the vocabulary more relevant. Permit me to offer some vocabulary words aimed at college success that I believe are highly relevant. I developed this list after visiting with several Milwaukee South Division High School students involved with a nonprofit program called College Possible.”(more)

Which Colleges Might Give You The Best Bang For Your Buck?

NPR – Sophia Alvarez Boyd

“The cost of college is high and rising, while a bachelor’s degree is practically required to get ahead. It’s hard enough for a family with means to get a student through school these days, let alone a low-income family. So, are the immediate costs of college, and the loans that can follow, worth it? A recent study took a look at each college in America and calculated the number of low-income graduates who wound up being top income earners. We call that mobility. The study comes from the Equality of Opportunity Project and is paired with an interactive tool from the New York Times.”(more)

Trying to Solve a Bigger Math Problem

The New York Times – Emily Hanford

“Algebra is clearly a stumbling block for many incoming college students. Nearly 60 percent of community college students end up in remedial math — that’s more than double the number in remedial English. Four-year public colleges are not far behind. According to government studies, 40 percent of their incoming students take at least one remedial class; 33 percent are in math. One explanation is obvious: limited academic preparation. Another is that much of the community college population is older, and rusty at factoring quadratics and finding inverse functions. Less obvious is that students end up in remediation who don’t need to be there.”(more)

Most colleges enroll many students who aren’t prepared for higher education

The Hechinger Report – Sarah Butrymowicz

“The vast majority of public two- and four-year colleges report enrolling students – more than half a million of them–who are not ready for college-level work, a Hechinger Report investigation of 44 states has found. The numbers reveal a glaring gap in the nation’s education system: A high school diploma, no matter how recently earned, doesn’t guarantee that students are prepared for college courses. Higher education institutions across the country are forced to spend time, money and energy to solve this disconnect. They must determine who’s not ready for college and attempt to get those students up to speed as quickly as possible, or risk losing them altogether.”(more)