Renascence School Education News - private school

Thursday, January 29, 2015

Inspiring a World of Good through Early Childhood Education in Singapore

The Huffington Post – Jackie Jenkins-Scott

“This year, Singapore celebrates its 50th anniversary as an independent country. This is an occasion to reflect on its remarkable progress over the last half century from a poor, underdeveloped, resource-scarce country to an economic dynamo whose per capita income is the world’s third highest. Singapore today is well known not just as a place to do business but for its headline-grabbing education system whose students routinely dominate global tests. Despite the strong test performance at higher grades, the country’s leadership understands that to be competitive in today’s global economy, its citizens need 21st century skills like creative problem solving, critical thinking, communication ability and being able to work in diverse teams…These skills need to be developed early and a strong foundation in the early years is the way to start…Just as Singapore used its low ranking [on early childhood education] as a national call to action, the United States needs more national action and collaboration for a country wide wake-up call to strengthen the sector…The dynamic economies of the 21st Century, such as Singapore, will be those with the best-trained citizens and we would do well to heed this call and prepare our all children for success.”(more)

Wednesday, January 7, 2015

The Tao of the liberal arts

The Washington Post – Valerie Strauss / Gerald Greenberg

“In this era when you can’t turn around in the education world without someone talking about science, technology, engineering and math, the liberal arts often get short shrift. Part of the reason is that people don’t fully understand what the liberal arts are and why they remain foundational to a real education. This post helps explain all of that…It doesn’t matter where you get your liberal arts education. What matters is that the school provides a liberal arts education that produces the appropriate result. What is that result? The transfer or creation of knowledge and the cultivation of the habits of the mind so graduates can develop and mature into successful, productive members of society who can appreciate others, experience and embrace the notion of empathy, and come to understand the joys and benefits of lifelong learning…In a world where people will change jobs multiple times in a lifetime and may hold jobs in the future that don’t even exist today, the knowledge they obtain in college and the writing, communicating, critical thinking, and analytic skills they acquire through a strong liberal arts CORE and liberal education will provide the foundation for a successful life, both professionally and personally.”(more)

Wednesday, December 24, 2014

Garden-Based Learning

BOOST Collaborative – Kristin Stayer

“Imagine a table full of a diverse range of vegetables and herbs, including chilies, okra, lemongrass, Swiss chard, gourds, figs, and persimmon. Gardens are places where students can experience all of their senses and be connected to the global world through the natural resources of earth. Gardens, and the people in the community near your garden, are an incredible asset to schools and afterschool programs…A study from Rutgers Cooperative Extension, “Learning Through the Garden,” shows that gardens can function as living laboratories, and students who participate in gardening have a considerable increase in grade point average, utilize new learning styles, and develop their perspectives and ways of learning to incorporate critical 21st century skills like “curiosity, flexibility, open-mindedness, informed skepticism, creativity, and critical thinking.””(more)

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Bloom’s Critical Thinking Questions To Use In Class

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning – Med Kharbach

“Critical thinking is an essential skill in the cognitive development of students. It is probably the number one skill teachers would mention when asked about the skills they target in their instruction. Critical thinking is also the key to developing other equally crucial thinking habits such as divergent, lateral and convergent thinking. Critical thinking starts with asking and answering critical questions. By critical questions I mean those questions that enable students to categorize, infer, synthesize, evaluate and apply the knowledge they have accumulated in the past to solve existing problems and learn new information. This is a well thought-out process in which students get to challenge their cognitive capacities and explore novel thinking paths.”(more)

Thursday, December 11, 2014

Seeds of learning: School uses garden to teach valuable lessons

Recordnet.com – Elizabeth Roberts

“A growing national movement incorporating gardening into the curriculum — and curriculum into the garden — is something of a passion for Principal Connor Sloan…Using the garden as a living classroom can do everything from broadening a student’s ability to connect the cycles and systems of nature to the sources of food to the nutritional connections between water and soil…It really helps infuse the process of inquiry, of asking questions, digging deeper…Studies have found that integrating gardening into the school day can boost test scores and student behavior.”(more)

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Arts Education Matters: We Know, We Measured It

Education Week – Jay P. Greene, Brian Kisida, Cari A. Bogulski, Anne Kraybill, Collin Hitt, & Daniel H. Bowen

“Though the arts receive relatively little attention from policymakers and school leaders, exposing young people to art and culture can have a big impact on their development…the important effects of art and cultural experiences on students can be rigorously measured. In fact, we recently conducted two studies…The results across our two experiments were remarkably consistent: These cultural experiences improve students’ knowledge about the arts, as well as their desire to become cultural consumers in the future. Exposure to the arts also affects the values of young people, making them more tolerant and empathetic. We suspect that their awareness of different people, places, and ideas through the arts helps them appreciate and accept the differences they find in the broader world. Arts experiences boost critical thinking, teaching students to take the time to be more careful and thorough in how they observe the world…Some of these qualities may help students earn a living, but their importance has more to do with students’ development into cultured and humane people.”(more)

Thursday, December 4, 2014

STEM + Art: A Brilliant Combination

Education Week – John Ceschini

“STEAM takes the benefits of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) learning and partners them with arts learning to reinforce 21st-century skills…The critical-thinking skills of analyzing, assessing, categorizing, classifying, predicting, justifying, interpreting, and more are reinforced by both the STEM disciplines and the arts.”(more)

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Q&A: Investing in science to reduce conflict in Africa

SciDev.net – Staff Writer

“Many of the recent conflicts in Africa could have been avoided if countries had invested in science…A scientific education could have led people to question instructions to kill their neighbours solely because of their ethnic origin…if the continent is to avoid being left behind in the global knowledge economy, African countries need to adopt a science and technology strategy…”(more)

Wednesday, November 5, 2014

Educator: Critical thinking key to STEM success

Springfield News-Sun – Katie Wedell

“In order to compete in the global economy, students should be encouraged to explore the STEM fields, but not at the expense of becoming well-rounded, critical thinkers…the most successful thinkers, the ones who will cure cancers and solve global warming, are those who have the creativity to think innovatively, the confidence to put their ideas out there and the technical skills and knowledge to bring their ideas to into reality…” (more)

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Global Competence Goes Global

Education Week – Alexis Menten

“For the first time, there is broad recognition around the world about the importance of educating for global competence…the basics are clearly no longer sufficient. All countries need to promote critical thinking, cross-cultural communication and collaboration, and the higher-order thinking skills that are required for workforce development in the 21st century.” (more)