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Longer hours on social media may increase teens’ risk of cyberbullying

Medical X-Press – Staff Writer

“Cyberbullying may be linked to higher use of social network sites by school children aged 14-17 years, rather than to simply having a social network profile, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Public Health, which examined data from several European countries. Researchers at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece found that school children in Romania, Germany and Poland were more likely to experience cyberbullying, such as aggressive and threatening messages, social exclusion, spreading rumors and sharing private, inappropriate or humiliating information, if they used social network sites for more than 2 hours a week day.” (more)

It’s time to develop an anti-cyberbullying policy; here’s how

E-School News – Kaitlin Beckmann

“As technology continues to permeate our lives inside and outside the classroom, educators, administrators, and students should work together to prevent the development of a cyberbullying culture. Research indicates that cyberbullying is detrimental to students and, in some cases, has been proven to be the cause of self-harm and suicide. Educators and parents need to find ways to actively engage our students and make sure they feel safe in their school community.” (more)

When Teens Cyberbully Themselves

KQED News Mind/Shift – Juli Fraga

“During the stressful teen years, most adolescents experience emotional highs and lows, but for more than 20 percent of teenagers, their worries and sad feelings turn into something more serious, like anxiety or depression. Studies show that 13 percent to 18 percent of distressed teens physically injure themselves via cutting, burning or other forms of self-harm as a way to cope with their pain.” (more)

Young victims of cyberbullying twice as likely to attempt suicide and self-harm

Medical X-Press – Staff Writer

“Children and young people under 25 who are victims of cyberbullying are more than twice as likely to self-harm and enact suicidal behavior, according to a study. New research suggests that it is not just the victims of cyberbullying that are more vulnerable to suicidal behaviours, but the perpetrators themselves are also at higher risk of experiencing suicidal thoughts and behaviours.” (more)

‘Bullied for the way I looked’

BBC – Katherine Sellgren

“”Hannah Lewis is a big, fat, lanky slag with greasy hair, a spotty face and a big nose. “Those words haunted me throughout my adolescence,” says Hannah, now 24. “Being the tallest in my class and developing early meant that I was always ‘different’ from the other children”, she recalls. But her experience is not uncommon, YMCA research finds, with more than half (55%) of children saying they had been bullied about the way they looked.” (more)

Bullying is still rife in schools. Here’s how teachers can tackle it

The Guardian – Elizabeth Nassem

“Many people will know what it feels like to be bullied. Despite a wealth of research and well-meaning interventions at a local level, bullying is still a common problem in UK schools (pdf) – and associated with depression, anxiety and even suicide. Schools are legally obliged to tackle bullying, but they may not have had the adequate guidance or training to do so, meaning that attempts to address it often focus on the more obvious forms of bullying, such as physical aggression, and overlook the children’s views.” (more)