RSI Corporate - Licensing

National Study Proves the Digital Age Hasn’t Diminished Importance of Paper

Education World – Nicole Gorman

“The Paper and Packaging Board recently released a national study surveying 3,200 students, parents and educators and found that despite the increase of technology in the classroom, paper has staying power. The report, titled the 2015 Annual Back-to-School Report, found that not only do a majority of students carry paper products, they prefer them as well. “[M]ore than 90 percent of students carry paper items every day. 94 percent of students say it’s easier to concentrate while reading a paper copy than a digital version,” the Board said in a statement. The report also suggested that the increase of digital technology has not diminished the importance of learning on paper, but rather has made it stronger.”(more)

Congo-Kinshasa: World Bank Supports Improved Science and Math Education in Democratic Republic of Congo

All Africa – Staff Writer

“The World Bank Group’s Board of Executive Directors today approved US$200 million to support improved teaching and learning of mathematics and science for secondary students, and enhance the relevance of technical and vocational education and training in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The project aims to provide students with practical skills for the country’s expanding labor market and will benefit 2.5 million students, of which 64% are female, by 2020. The US$200 million International Development Association (IDA)* combined grant and credit approved today supports the Quality and Relevance of Secondary and Tertiary Education Project, the first phase of a broad agenda to assist the Government in improving the quality of post-basic education by building upon achievements made at the primary education level.”(more)

Congo-Kinshasa: Success of Remedial Education in DRC

Allafrica.com – Badylon K. Bakiman

“The government of the Democratic Republic of Congo is enjoying success with the remedial education centres set up to give children from underprivileged backgrounds a free education and vocational training.” (more)

New programs help refugees in Idaho reclaim their careers

The Idaho Statesman – Anna Webb

“Schools are familiar places for Asukulu Etoka. He was a teacher in his homeland, the Democratic Republic of Congo. While teaching, he went to school himself, earning certificates and an advanced degree. He became a middle school principal, then a high school principal. Today, he still works in an academic setting, but he has a different role: He’s one of two night custodians at Hidden Springs Elementary. His day starts at 3 p.m. and ends at 11, after he has cleaned the school’s four buildings, classrooms and hallways.”(more)

Urban Teacher Gives Up Life in Nation to Start Afresh in Angola

All Africa – Celine Schmitt

“Pedro is the kind of urban professional that Angola needs to help build stability and a viable future after years of devastating conflict. But he was born in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and has mixed memories of the short time that he stayed in the land of his parents after Angola gained independence from Portugal in 1975. Recalling his life, Pedro went from the depths of losing his parents as a boy, and having to fend for himself, to the high of graduating from university.”(more)