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Education is the topic for the new World Development Report

The World Bank – KAUSHIK BASU

“Education is central to improving human welfare and to achieving the goals of eliminating extreme poverty and boosting shared prosperity. Schooling was recognized as vital to achieving the MDGs, and it remains front and center in the SDGs. Yet there has never been a World Development Report (WDR) on education. As a result, I have just announced that the WDR 2018—with a working title of Realizing the Promise of Education for Development—will fill this gap by taking stock of what the development community has learned, and how it can strengthen and expand education systems to drive significantly more development and growth.”(more)

BASF taking innovation where markets are

China Daily- Zhu Wenqian

“BASF director says the firm is coasting on its long history with China to industrial glory
BASF SE’s association with China goes back all the way to 1885. Over the last 130 years, the Ludwigshafen, Germany-headquartered 150-year-old multinational, which deals mainly in chemicals, plastics, performance products, crop protection products, petrochemicals, nutrition and health products, oil and gas, has made China key to its growth and evolution.
Sanjeev Gandhi, 49, one of BASF’s executive directors, now heads the company’s operations in Greater China and Asia Pacific. A BASF veteran, Gandhi has risen through the ranks over 22 years to reach the Board of Executive Directors.”(more)

HK$2.6b extra for pre-school education

HK Edition- oseph Li in Hong Kong

“The recurrent government expenditure for kindergarten education will rise from HK$4.1 billion to HK$6.7 billion, after Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying pledged in the latest Policy Address to offer quality, free kindergarten education to children aged 3 to 6 from school year 2017-18 – with a view to lifting the overall quality of pre-school education.
The government hopes to deliver quality kindergarten education through a new curriculum, better teacher quality and improved governance of schools, following implementation of free education.
Subsidies to kindergartens will increase significantly, Education Bureau (EDB) sources said. For a long whole-day kindergarten with 90 students, the annual subsidy will increase from HK$2 million under the existing education voucher system to HK$4.9 million. For a whole-day kindergarten with 90 students, the annual subsidy will increase to HK$4 million from HK$2 million now. And for a half-day kindergarten with 200 students, the annual subsidy will rise to HK$6.6 million from the current HK$4.5 million.”(more)

Why girls’ education is the world’s best investment

Brookings – Rebecca Winthrop, Fred Dews & Bill Finan

“In this podcast, Rebecca Winthrop, senior fellow and director of the Center for Universal Education at Brookings, walks us through the evolution of girls’ education and how “Twenty-five years ago, girls’ education was an issue in every single country in the world.” She reminds us that there’s a reason to be optimistic: “There are a lot of huge gains in girls’ education. There is a lot to celebrate. Over the last twenty years, the number of girls who have been out of school have been cut in half.””(more)

Prioritizing Basic Education and Global Competence: Papua New Guinea

Education Week – Heather Singmaster

“What I found is a country that, yes, is very poor and facing what may seem to be overwhelming challenges. But, despite these, Papua New Guinea is taking positive steps to address them, including a budget that is focused on the pillars of health, education, infrastructure development, and increased funding direct to the provinces…Despite facing the huge challenge of providing education for all students, they are prioritizing an education infused with global competence…The curriculum will prepare students who are more flexible for a changing world…. (its) principles are based on significant cultural, social, and educational values and beliefs such as: (i) bilingual education: education in vernaculars and English; (ii) citizenship: roles, rights, and responsibilities in society; (iii) law and order: good governance; and (iv) lifelong learning: applied learning…As Papua New Guinea demonstrates, global competence is relevant to developing and developed countries alike.”(more)

Global ‘100-year gap’ in education standards

BBC News – Rebecca Winthrop

“There has been a convergence in the number of pupils enrolling in primary school, with many more young children in developing countries now having access to school. But when it comes to average levels of attainment – how much children have learnt and how long they have spent in school – there remains a massive gap. When it’s shown as an average number of years in school and levels of achievement, the developing world is about 100 years behind developed countries. These poorer countries still have average levels of education in the 21st Century that were achieved in many western countries by the early decades of the 20th Century. If we continue with the current approaches to global education, this century-wide gap will continue into the future.”(more)