RSI Corporate - Licensing

Is your child ready for a smartphone?

Medical X-Press – Julie Davis

“When is it appropriate to give kids a cellphone? That depends on factors like their maturity level, their ability to follow rules at home and school, and your family’s circumstances, including health and safety issues. For instance, if both parents work outside the home, it’s easier to check in with a child during the day if he or she has a phone.”(more)

How Parents Can Help Kids Navigate the Pressures of Their Digital Lives

KQED News Mind/Shift – Leah Shafer

“As adults witness the rising tides of teenaged anxiety, it’s tough not to notice a common thread that runs through the epidemic — something that past generations never dealt with. Clutched in the hand of nearly every teen is a smartphone, buzzing and beeping and blinking with social media notifications. Parents, all too often, just want to grab their teen’s phone and stuff it in a drawer. But is social media and the omnipresence of digital interactions really the cause of all this anxiety? The short answer is: It’s complicated.”(more)

The Possibilities for Tech (and Screentime) in the Preschool Classroom

Ed Surge – Sara DeWitt

“We’re a military family, which means my five-year-old has already lived in four states. By my calculation, he has experienced seven different daycare, preschool and elementary school classrooms. While the classrooms centers, teacher ratios and playground equipment may be different, every center but one made the same comment to us during registration: “And, of course, we don’t do any screen time.” Kids live in a world where they see technology all around them. For better or worse, the adults in their lives are using it all the time. I love that preschool classrooms are often a place where children dive into the hands-on experiences of building, touching surfaces, singing songs and stomping their feet, but do they have to be completely guarded from technology? I would argue that preschool is a place where we can thoughtfully introduce technology and, more importantly, model appropriate and informed uses of digital platforms.”(more)

Making Media Literacy Central to Digital Citizenship

KQED News Mind/Shift – Tanner Higgin

“It’s easy to get caught up in the hype around the latest and greatest classroom tech, from video games to 3-D printers to Raspberry Pi kits to VR to AR and beyond. The reality is that kind of tech — expensive, bleeding-edge tools — makes headlines but doesn’t make it into many classrooms, especially the most needy ones. What does, however, is video. While we often get distracted by the latest device or platform release, video has quietly been riding the wave of all of these advancements, benefiting from broader access to phones, displays, cameras and, most importantly, bandwidth. In fact, 68 percent of teachers are using video in their classrooms, and 74 percent of middle schoolers are watching videos for learning. From social media streams chock-full of video and GIFs to FaceTime with friends to two-hour Twitch broadcasts, video mediates students’ relationships with each other and the world. Video is a key aspect of our always-online attention economy that’s impacting voting behavior, and fueling hate speech and trolling. Put simply: Video is a contested civic space.”(more)

What Your Students Really Need to Know About Digital Citizenship

Edutopia – Staff Writer

“In my classroom, I use two essential approaches in the digital citizenship curriculum that I teach: proactive knowledge and experiential knowledge… I want my students to know the “9 Key Ps” of digital citizenship. While I go into these Ps in detail in my book Reinventing Writing, here are the basics: 1. Passwords: Do students know how to create a secure password? Do they know that email and online banking should have a higher level of security and never use the same passwords as other sites? Do they have a system like LastPass for managing passwords, or a secure app where they store this information?.”(more)

Three Ways Parents Can Make Digital Media a Positive for Young Kids

KQED News Mind/Shift – Katrina Schwartz

“Digital technologies have added a new element of anxiety to family life for many parents. A lot of kids now have access to mobile devices, which brings up parent concerns that kids aren’t learning to interact with people, spend too much time on devices and no longer play outside. Often parents are most concerned about their young children spending time on devices because they know the early years are a crucial time for a child’s brain development. But at the same time, parents are often just as addicted to technology as their children, constantly checking phones for news, work and fun. The discussion around the best way to handle mobile devices is a good one to continue, but Sara DeWitt of PBS Kids Digital says some of parents’ deepest fears could be holding them back from seeing the potential of digital technology.”(more)