RSI Corporate - Licensing

What Do We Know About School Discipline Reform?

Education Next – Matthew P. Steinberg and Johanna Lacoe

“The U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights announced this spring that the number of suspensions and expulsions in the nation’s public schools had dropped 20 percent between 2012 and 2014. The news was welcomed by those who oppose the frequent use of suspensions and expulsions, known as exclusionary discipline. In recent years, many policymakers and educators have called for the adoption of alternative disciplinary strategies that allow students to stay in school and not miss valuable learning time. Advocates for discipline reform contend that suspensions are meted out in a biased way, because minority students and those with disabilities receive a disproportionate share of them. Some also assert that reducing suspensions would improve school climate for all students.”(more)

Why Discipline Should Be Aligned With A School’s Learning Philosophy

KQED News Mind/Shift – Katrina Schwartz

“After school one day, a middle school girl got physically aggressive with one of her peers while still on school property. At some schools she would have been suspended or expelled for assaulting another student, but High Tech Middle Chula Vista is experimenting with restorative practices. So, instead of taking that typical disciplinary step, school leaders called the two students and their families in for a meeting, where they discussed what had led up to the point where she boiled over and lashed out. “It was incredibly deep and emotional,” said Rhea Brown, a recent graduate of the High Tech High Graduate School of Education, who was working in the school at the time. Not only were the students able to talk through the underlying issues of the fight, but the student who would have been suspended ended up feeling reconnected to the school community, not alienated. And, she became a big advocate for restorative practices, often pushing students in conflict to meet with the social and emotional coach to work out their problems.”(more)

High School Suspensions Cost The Country $35 Billion Annually, Report Estimates

NPR Ed – Anya Kamenetz

“When students get suspended from school for a few days, they may not be the only ones who miss out. A report released today by UCLA’s Civil Rights Project tries for the first time to quantify the full social cost of so-called “exclusionary discipline.”…The authors calculate that suspensions in just one year of school — 10th grade — contributed to 67,000 students eventually dropping out of high school. And that, they conclude, generates total costs to the nation of more than $35 billion…The study concludes that in-school suspensions are just as bad when it comes to their impact on dropout rates. And in places like LA Unified, teachers have complained that class disruptions go up when they don’t have the power to remove certain students. What works instead, says the report, are evidence-based practices like restorative justice and social and emotional skill-building, where educators actively help teenagers resolve conflicts and manage tough emotions to get at the roots of misbehavior.”(more)

Crackdowns on Bullies Can Backfire, National Academies Report Finds

Education Week – Evie Blad

“Some common ways schools work to prevent and respond to bullying are ineffective and, in some cases, counterproductive, a panel of researchers assembled by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine wrote in a report released today. Tough penalties for bullying, which have grown popular as public awareness of its effects has grown, may actually make the problem worse, the researchers found. That’s because victims may view the consequences as too harsh or fear retaliation, which may keep them from reporting bullying…”This is a pivotal time for bullying prevention,” researchers conclude. “Reducing the prevalence of bullying and minimizing the harm it imparts on children can have a dramatic impact on children’s well-being and development. Many programs and policies have been developed, but more needs to be known about what types of programs or investments will be most effective.” “(more)

Could Empathy Training Help Teachers Reduce Suspensions?

Education World – Nicole Gorman

“A new study from Stanford University researchers has found that there is a direct correlation between empathy training for teachers and reduced suspensions in schools. According to the study, which was recently published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, teachers who received reading material and online courses teaching empathy were significantly less likely to suspend students than teachers who did not. The researchers conducted the study by splitting “39 K–12 teachers from five California public schools into two groups and randomly assigned them to read one of two research articles: one that said ‘good teacher-student relationships are critical for students to learn self-control’ and another that said ‘punishment is critical for teachers to take control of the classroom,’” according to”(more)

Time management critical for success

News Herald – Juliann Talkington


“Learning to read, write, solve mathematics problems, apply scientific principles to real world situations, and speak a foreign language are not the only skills children need to acquire before they leave home.” ~Confucius

Many experts argue that time management abilities are equally important. Academically gifted people cannot survive in modern society if they are not able to deliver a high quality product, on time.

Most K-12 schools are struggling to teach time management skills, because parents are constantly pressuring them about grades. Many teachers are under so much pressure to issue high marks that they create extra opportunities for students to improve their final course grade.

Although “second chances” give the parents what they want, they have the unintended consequence of teaching kids that planning is irrelevant because there are always other opportunities to change the result.

When young people get to college and/or enter the workforce “second chances” are rare. Most college professors do not offer extra papers or problem sets at the end of the semester and employers take a dim view of late arrivals, shoddy work, and missed deadlines.

Since it has become impossible for most K-12 teachers to teach time management, parents must handle the task at home.

As a first step, kids need to learn how to plan ahead. There are many free computer-based scheduling applications that help in this area. Kids generally find it easy to enter homework day by day, but often need coaching on how to break future activities, like preparing for a test that is two weeks away, into daily tasks.

Then children need to learn how to make productive use of time. For example, it takes “forever” to finish math homework when kids chat online between problems. Learning to stay off social media during homework time can go a long way to improving efficiency.

Sleep is also important for time management. It takes less time to learn material and complete homework tasks when the brain is rested, so it is important to make sure your kids get enough sleep each night.

Multi-taking is not efficient. Teach your childred to finish one task before they begins another one.

Procrastination never pays. If something is due today, make sure it is finished. Otherwise, the next day will be overwhelming.

Prioritize homework first. This prevents late nights and productivity problems.

Learning to manage time is challenging. Start teaching your child early and reward progress often!