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Why Getting Help for Kids with Dyslexia is Difficult

KQED News Mind/Shift – Emily Hanford

“The reluctance to confirm that a child is “dyslexic” goes beyond avoiding a label that could harm kids. Public schools nationwide have long refused to use the word, allowing many of them to avoid providing special education services as required by federal law. According to dozens of interviews with parents, students, researchers, lawyers and teachers across the country, many public schools are not identifying students with dyslexia and are ignoring their needs.”(more)

Dyslexia—when spelling problems impair writing acquisition

Medical X-Press – Staff Writer

“Dyslexia is a reading disorder that affects the ability to adopt the automatic reflexes needed to read and write. Several studies have sought to identify the source of the problems experienced by individuals with dyslexia when they read. Little attention, however, has been paid to the mechanisms involved in writing. CNRS Professor Sonia Kandel and her team studied the purely motor aspects of writing in children diagnosed with dyslexia. Their results show that orthographic processing in children with dyslexia is so laborious that it can modify or impair writing skills, despite the absence of dysgraphia in these children. The findings of this study are published in the November 2017 edition of Cognitive Neuropsychology.”(more)

How schools are disrupting dyslexia

District Administration – Eleanor Chute

“Educators know that most dyslexic students will need interventions and accommodations throughout school, but best practices continue to evolve as more is learned about this reading disability. Addressing dyslexia should start with universal screening in kindergarten or first grade, if not sooner, says Marilyn Zecher, a language therapist who provides PD with the Atlantic Seaboard Dyslexia Education Center in Maryland.”(more)

How to detect the risk of dyslexia before learning to read

Medical X-Press – Staff Writer

“Almost 10 percent of the world’s population suffers dyslexia. Establishing an early diagnosis would allow the development of training programs to palliate this disorder. This goal could be closer after a study carried out by the Basque Centre on Cognition, Brain and Language (BCBL) associating auditory processing in children with their reading skills. The results offer a new approach for detecting the risk before children learn to read.”(more)

How to create a dyslexia-friendly environment in your school

E-School News – Meris Stansbury

According to the National Assessment of Educational Progress, 80 percent of students with learning disabilities have dyslexia. In order to create a learning environment that feels safe, comfortable and empowering for students, schools need to adhere to basic guiding principles. In “Creating a Dyslexia-Friendly School,” Terrie Noland, national director, Educator Engagement for Learning Ally, presented on early intervention for dyslexic students, using the right AT (assistive technology) tools and accommodations for each learner, and creating environments in which students can thrive.”(more)

Dyslexia, once the reading disability that shall not be named, comes into its own in California

Ed Source – Jane Meredith Adams

“The hope is for districts across the state to follow Knightsen’s example, according to legislation that last week produced its goal: the release of the California Department of Education’s California Dyslexia Guidelines, a long-awaited document meant to let schools know what exactly dyslexia is and what interventions have been proven effective. Estimates of the prevalence of dyslexia range from 5 to 20 percent of the U.S. population — which would mean between 300,000 and 1.2 million children in California public schools. Brain imagery has shown that people with dyslexia process word identification differently, and children do not outgrow dyslexia. The goal is to learn how to compensate for it. The disability is unrelated to intelligence, but students have long floundered without the correct help.”(more)