RSI Corporate - Licensing

Foreign Language Learning for Children: Necessity or Option?

Relocate Magazine – Staff Writer

“Linguistically, younger children have the potential to develop near native proficiency with pronunciation and intonation in a new language. They also develop a cognitive advantage over children who do not learn a subsequent language as second language acquisition helps to develop critical thinking skills, creativity, and elasticity of mind. In the case of the expatriate children, one of the greatest advantages is that they have the ability to mimic closely the native pronunciation and intonation of a new language through their interaction with teachers and peers. In addition, literacy skills that have been developed in the native language transfer to the learning of the new language. In the long-term, these children will be better suited to work in a global workplace due to their first-hand understanding of the language and culture of another country.”(more)

Kids Should Play In The Dirt To Improve Their Health

Education News – Kristen Decarr

“Authors of a new book suggest that children need to be allowed to get dirty in order to gain access to certain microbes that they say are necessary to develop a healthy immune system. Authors B. Brett Finlay and Marie-Claire Arrieta argue in their new book “Let Them Eat Dirt: Saving Your Child from an Oversanitized World” that allowing children to get dirty will expose them to healthy germs that will actually help them in the long-run.”(more)

14 classroom management strategies to increase student learning

E-School News – Laura Devaney

“When the right classroom management tools are in place, students are able to learn more as their engagement increases. Focusing on physical classroom management, behavioral management, resources for effective instruction, attendance and gradebook tools, and tools for a school-home connection can help students master classroom lessons.”(more)

Will.i.am Wants Mandatory Computer Science Classes in Schools

Fortune – Kia Kokalitcheva

“To music artist Will.i.am, technology can change the world. On Tuesday, Will.i.am, the former Black Eyed Peas singer whose legal name is William Adams, dropped by the Apple Store in San Francisco’s Union Square for a screening of the music video for a new version of the group’s 2003 hit Where Is the Love? He was joined by Apple retail chief Angela Ahrendts, and discussed why the proceeds from the song would go toward education programs and initiatives through Adams’ i.am.angel foundation. Specifically, Adams highlighted the importance of making computer science classes available more broadly in schools, especially in disadvantaged neighborhoods.”(more)

How much video gaming is too much for kids?

Medical X-Press – Alan Mozes

“Playing video games might improve a child’s motor skills, reaction time and even academic performance, but new research shows that too much gaming can be linked to social and behavioral problems. Spanish investigators found that any skill enhancements linked to gaming among those aged 7 to 11 started to max out after about eight hours of gaming a week. And those who played nine hours or more a week were more likely to have social and behavioral problems. The bottom-line: “One to nine hours per week seems to be safe, but playing more than nine hours—one hour on weekdays and two hours on weekend days—may be not recommended for children 7 to 11 years old,” said study author Dr. Jesus Pujol. But the study “does not permit [us] to directly establish whether the observed effects are a cause or consequence of gaming,” Pujol stressed.”(more)

SAT scores: California lags nation

The East Bay Times – Sharon Noguchi

“California’s Class of 2016 scored lower than the national average on SAT reading and math tests, although state students outperformed their national peers in writing, just-released scores show. But the scores released late Monday may represent more than the state’s periodic fluctuation in national comparisons of reading and math. California’s sinking scores may reflect the SAT’s increasing democratization, with more students at differing levels of preparation taking the exam. California saw a 1.6 percent increase in the number of seniors taking the test to nearly 241,600 students. According to the College Board, the private group that runs the test, the increase is due to districts like West Contra Costa and San Jose Unified, which offer students the opportunity to take the test on a school day and cover the fees — about $50 per student.”(more)