RSI Corporate - Licensing

Preventing bullying through…fiction? It works!

E-School News – Michael Dahl

“When you read, you become another person, if only for a short while. You see how that person lives and how they think. You experience their hopes and fears, and you see how they’ve come to be who they are. If you read five different books, you have a window into the lives of five different people. That’s what empathy is: to feel for that other person, and it opens you up to different experiences you may never have otherwise been able to share.”(more)

Analysis: After Disasters Like Harvey and Irma, the Road to a Child’s Emotional Recovery May Start at School

The 74 Million – Alison Crean Davis

“Andrew, Hugo, Katrina, Sandy, Harvey, and now Irma. We have some history in this country with educational systems striving to recover after they, and their cities, have been inundated with the devastating winds and rising floodwaters of hurricanes. Post-Harvey, the education headlines are focused on getting schools open and Houston’s students in the doors. It’s a critical start and consistent with stories that arose in the weeks and months after Katrina’s devastating hit on Louisiana: Schools needed to reopen, teachers and students were displaced, school systems and policies were being reconceived. But the recovery process can’t end with logistics, because the very children returning to these schools may present with varying symptoms of emotional trauma that could unfold over several years.”(more)

OPINION: Ending “one size fits all” programs for social-emotional learning

The Hechinger Report – Jessica Berlinski

Students from underserved populations do not have the same opportunities for a strong education as their more-affluent peers. This is the harsh reality that data from Stanford’s sweeping 2009-2013 study bears out. As policymakers and educators struggle with how to shift this phenomenon, social-emotional learning has emerged as a solution to the challenge of achieving educational equity; they certainly comprise part of the solution to this multifaceted challenge.”(more)

Having A Best Friend In Your Teenage Years Could Benefit You For Life

KQED News Mind/Shift – Angus Chen

“The researchers followed 169 people for 10 years, starting when they were 15 years old. At age 15 and again at 16, the participants were asked to bring in their closest friends for one-on-one interviews with the researchers. “[They were asked] how much trust there is, how good communication is and how alienated they feel in the relationship,” says Rachel Narr, the lead author on the study and a doctoral student in psychology at the University of Virginia. Each year, the original participants were also given questionnaires to assess levels of anxiety, depression and self-worth. Narr says that when she watched videos made in the early years of the study of the teens asking their best friends for advice or support or talking through a disagreement, it was easy to tell which relationships were strong. “These teens tend to be open with one another about difficult topics, and they’re more engaged with one another and helping the other person and connecting with the other person,” she says.”(more)

Steps parents can take to raise kind kids

Moms Everyday – Liz Hayes

” Bullying is now one of the top concerns parents have about their kids’ health, according to a recent survey published in US News and World Report, just behind obesity and right before drug use. Less than ten years ago, bullying didn’t even show up in the top ten. From the school yard to the classroom and certainly online, bullying is tough to avoid. Developmental psychologist Selma Caal says children can show aggressive behavior as young as 17 months, which is often normal. But there are things parents can do to help children assert themselves without hurting others.”(more)

What Do We Mean When We Say ‘Social And Emotional Skills’?

KQED News Mind/Shift – Anya Kamenetz

“More and more, people in education agree on the importance of schools’ paying attention to stuff other than academics. But still, no one agrees on what to call that “stuff.” I originally published a story on this topic two years ago. As I reported back then, there were a bunch of overlapping terms in play, from “character” to “grit” to “noncognitive skills.” This bagginess bugged me, as a member of the education media. It bugged researchers and policymakers too. It still does.”(more)