RSI Corporate - Licensing

Exaggerated Thoughts That Can Cause Adolescents to Misperceive Reality

KQED News Mind/Shift – Jess P. Shatkin

“In the late 1950s, University of Pennsylvania psychiatrist Aaron Beck, MD, studied the effectiveness of psychoanalysis for the treatment of depression. Beck committed to the theoretical foundations of Freud’s “talking cure.” To his great surprise and disappointment, however, the experiments failed to validate the treatment. By the early ’60s, Beck had penned two important articles on “thinking and depression,” which ultimately led to the development of cognitive behavioral therapy (currently the premier evidence‐based psychotherapeutic treatment for anxiety and depression in both adolescents and adults) and the design of the cognitive triangle, as shown in the diagram below.”(more)

4 Tools to Help Kids Develop Empathy and Cultural Humility

KQED News Mind/Shift – Danny Wagner

“Humility is not necessarily about modesty or pretending to be less than you are. In fact, people who are humble often have a high sense of self-worth; it’s just that they can recognize their own strengths and limitations. Research about humility also suggests a strong connection between being humble and being generous. For kids growing up in a media-driven world that often rewards narcissism, humility has become a way to stand up and stand out, like this valedictorian student who used a secret Instagram profile to sing the praises of his peers.”(more)

Emotional intelligence: why it matters and how to teach it

The Guardian – Bradley Busch

“In our work with schools, it’s now commonplace for us to hear those in education talking about helping students (and staff) develop their emotional intelligence. But what do we mean exactly? Why and how should teachers support its development in their students? Emotional intelligence can be said to cover five main areas: self-awareness, emotional control, self-motivation, empathy and relationship skills. It is, of course, important for good communication with others – and is therefore a gateway to better learning, friendships, academic success and employment. Skills such as these developed in our formative years at school often provide the foundation for future habits later on in life.”(more)

How to use picture books to get your class talking about emotions

The Guardian – Helen Hanna and Stefan Kucharczyk

“In the early years of primary education, there is a healthy emphasis on circle time discussion that allows children to talk about their feelings openly. One of the most effective and long-standing strategies to talk about difficult emotional issues such as anxiety and loneliness has been to use stories.”(more)

Preventing bullying through…fiction? It works!

E-School News – Michael Dahl

“When you read, you become another person, if only for a short while. You see how that person lives and how they think. You experience their hopes and fears, and you see how they’ve come to be who they are. If you read five different books, you have a window into the lives of five different people. That’s what empathy is: to feel for that other person, and it opens you up to different experiences you may never have otherwise been able to share.”(more)

OPINION: Ending “one size fits all” programs for social-emotional learning

The Hechinger Report – Jessica Berlinski

Students from underserved populations do not have the same opportunities for a strong education as their more-affluent peers. This is the harsh reality that data from Stanford’s sweeping 2009-2013 study bears out. As policymakers and educators struggle with how to shift this phenomenon, social-emotional learning has emerged as a solution to the challenge of achieving educational equity; they certainly comprise part of the solution to this multifaceted challenge.”(more)