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Will the Evolution of STEM Education Produce a More Advanced Generation of EEs?

All About Circuits – Heather Hamilton-Post

“The need for additional applicants in STEM fields continues to rise, and students who begin these studies earlier are better equipped to fulfill these roles. From programming robots to working with satellites and remote vehicles, students are more interested than ever in STEM programs, which offer more real-world experience and interactivity than more traditional methods of education. And, as companies and researchers collaborate to meet the unique needs of STEM in the classroom, teachers are getting onboard, too.”(more)

The 25 highest-paying jobs in America

USA Today – Courtney Connley

“Students looking to bring home the best pay throughout their careers may want to consider careers in law, medicine or engineering. According to a report from job search platform Glassdoor, some of the best-compensated jobs in the U.S. are concentrated in those fields. To compile its list of highest-paying jobs in America, Glassdoor examined the job titles that received at least 100 salary reports over the past year and applied a statistical algorithm to estimate the annual base pay for each. C-suite level jobs were excluded from the list.”(more)

Bringing science and engineering stories to life for students

PRI – Julia Franz

“How about a little news? That’s the idea behind the Science Friday Educator Collaborative, now in its second year. Seven teachers around the country are designing curiosity-provoking science, technology, engineering and mathematics resources for anyone to use, based on stories from Science Friday. Stacy George, who teaches STEM to elementary schoolchildren in Hawaii, pulled together a guide for observing the shape of bee honeycombs that was inspired by an article on Science Friday’s website. “The lesson actually started from the students,” she says, who were afraid of the honeybees they encountered while watering the school’s garden, “and so they would throw buckets of water from 5 feet away.”(more)

Inventor Of The Super Soaker Is Supporting The Next Generation Of Engineers

The Huffington Post – Taryn Finley

“The man who invented the Super Soaker wants to make a positive impact on the new generation of engineers. Lonnie Johnson is using his nonprofit to help fund high school robotics teams, NBC News reported Thursday. One team he helps, DISCbots, is made up of refugees from nine countries. The team is in its second year and has already qualified for a worldwide robotics tournament in Texas. “If I can have a positive impact … clearly it’s something I want to do,” Johnson said. The inventor, who grew up in Mobile, Alabama, during the Jim Crow era, became interested in engineering as a youth, according to BBC. He built a robot for a fair held by the Junior Engineering Technical Society at the University of Alabama during his senior year of high school in 1968. The only black student in the competition, Johnson won first place for his robot, Linex.”(more)

How Women Mentors Make a Difference in Engineering

The Atlantic – Ed Yong

“For some women, enrolling in an engineering course is like running a psychological gauntlet. If they dodge overt problems like sexual harassment, sexist jokes, or poor treatment from professors, they often still have to evade subtler obstacles like the implicit tendency to see engineering as a male discipline. It’s no wonder women in the U.S. hold just 13 to 22 percent of the doctorates in engineering, compared to an already-low 33 percent in the sciences as a whole. Nilanjana Dasgupta, from the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, thinks that mentors—people who can give advice, share experiences, or make social connections—can dismantle the gauntlet, and help young women to find their place in an often hostile field.”(more)

As a female engineer, I aim to design rockets. I want other girls to be equally ambitious

The Guardian – Temitayo Adedipe

“Each time I tell a friend that I’m studying engineering because I want to design aeroplanes, I get more or less the same reaction, along the lines of: “Wow, you must be really smart.” Many of my female friends appear to think my goals are unreachable for them, and male friends seem to admire it as something extraordinary. I hope to see these views change in the next 10 years or so. Engineering needs to be seen differently, not as a tough subject or one specifically for men. It can be challenging, but it’s all about mindset and vision.”(more)