RSI Corporate - Licensing

Report: STEM Degrees Rise, but Disparities Remain

The U.S. News and World Report – Claire Hansen

“Despite modest gains in degree attainment in science, technology, engineering and math, women and minorities remain grossly underrepresented in the fields, according to a new report out Wednesday. Women are also less likely to enter STEM occupations after earning a STEM degree as are blacks, Hispanics and Native Americans, according to the report, which was prepared by the RAND corporation and commissioned by the American Petroleum Institute, a trade association with over 625 members in the oil and natural gas field. The report analyzes broad STEM degree attainment and employment trends, and pays specific attention those in the the oil and natural gas sector.”(more)

How to use engineering practices for more effective STEM learning

E-School News – PJ Boardman

“‘What if schools could offer a different approach to STEM education that provided students with truly immersive learning opportunities?” That question came to Ethan Berman, founder of i2 Learning, after the experience of his nine-year old daughter, who liked school but loved solving problems and making things with her own hands, especially, as she put it, “if it was something useful.” That was what inspired Berman to found Boston STEM Week, which just concluded its second successful year by replacing the usual curriculum for the more than 6,000 students and 300 teachers across 37 Boston middle schools. During this week, schools replace their usual curriculum with projects aimed at building lunar colonies, creating interactive monsters, designing digital games, and practicing surgical techniques.”(more)

Will the Evolution of STEM Education Produce a More Advanced Generation of EEs?

All About Circuits – Heather Hamilton-Post

“The need for additional applicants in STEM fields continues to rise, and students who begin these studies earlier are better equipped to fulfill these roles. From programming robots to working with satellites and remote vehicles, students are more interested than ever in STEM programs, which offer more real-world experience and interactivity than more traditional methods of education. And, as companies and researchers collaborate to meet the unique needs of STEM in the classroom, teachers are getting onboard, too.”(more)

The 25 highest-paying jobs in America

USA Today – Courtney Connley

“Students looking to bring home the best pay throughout their careers may want to consider careers in law, medicine or engineering. According to a report from job search platform Glassdoor, some of the best-compensated jobs in the U.S. are concentrated in those fields. To compile its list of highest-paying jobs in America, Glassdoor examined the job titles that received at least 100 salary reports over the past year and applied a statistical algorithm to estimate the annual base pay for each. C-suite level jobs were excluded from the list.”(more)

Bringing science and engineering stories to life for students

PRI – Julia Franz

“How about a little news? That’s the idea behind the Science Friday Educator Collaborative, now in its second year. Seven teachers around the country are designing curiosity-provoking science, technology, engineering and mathematics resources for anyone to use, based on stories from Science Friday. Stacy George, who teaches STEM to elementary schoolchildren in Hawaii, pulled together a guide for observing the shape of bee honeycombs that was inspired by an article on Science Friday’s website. “The lesson actually started from the students,” she says, who were afraid of the honeybees they encountered while watering the school’s garden, “and so they would throw buckets of water from 5 feet away.”(more)

Inventor Of The Super Soaker Is Supporting The Next Generation Of Engineers

The Huffington Post – Taryn Finley

“The man who invented the Super Soaker wants to make a positive impact on the new generation of engineers. Lonnie Johnson is using his nonprofit to help fund high school robotics teams, NBC News reported Thursday. One team he helps, DISCbots, is made up of refugees from nine countries. The team is in its second year and has already qualified for a worldwide robotics tournament in Texas. “If I can have a positive impact … clearly it’s something I want to do,” Johnson said. The inventor, who grew up in Mobile, Alabama, during the Jim Crow era, became interested in engineering as a youth, according to BBC. He built a robot for a fair held by the Junior Engineering Technical Society at the University of Alabama during his senior year of high school in 1968. The only black student in the competition, Johnson won first place for his robot, Linex.”(more)