RSI Corporate - Licensing

Five languages Brexit Britons should learn

The Financial Times – Michael Skapinker

“The British Council survey attempts to address a looming post-Brexit problem. An end to EU freedom of movement may mean UK companies losing easy access to the Italians, Spaniards and Germans and many others who helped staff their European sales and marketing departments, not to mention many other parts of their businesses. And while English is now the world’s lingua franca, poor UK foreign language skills risk damaging the country’s future, the British Council says. It is not just that much direct-to-consumer business still has to be done in the customer’s language. It is also that being a monoglot blinds you to the rest of the world’s richness and complexity. Britons are going to have to become more culturally adept as the UK tries to establish new trading relationships, and keep up its existing ones.”(more)

Careers guidance at school: how to make it work for your students

The Guardian – Tristram Hooley

“How are schools doing on careers advice for their students? This is the question we posed for the new State of the Nation 2017 report, published by social enterprise The Careers & Enterprise Company. Our findings are based on 600 schools completing a self-assessment tool, giving us insights into their delivery of careers provision.”(more)

Global Britain needs more linguists if we are to succeed after Brexit

The Telegraph – Nick Gibb

“We are a country that thrives in making its way in the world. Once we leave the European Union we will, once again, be free to forge mutually beneficial relationships with peoples all over the globe. Drawing on the genius of the great economists of our Union’s history, this Kingdom will once again be at the forefront of global free trade. Once again, it will fall to Britain and her close allies to make the Smith, Mill and Ricardo’s moral and economic case for markets, free trade and comparative advantage.”(more)

Teens ‘rebelling against social media’, say headteachers

BBC – Emma Thelwell

“Almost two-thirds of schoolchildren would not mind if social media had never been invented, research suggests. A survey of almost 5,000 students, mainly aged between 14 and 16, found a growing backlash against social media – with even more pupils (71%) admitting to taking digital detoxes to escape it. Benenden, an independent girls boarding school in Kent, told BBC News that its pupils set up a three-day “phone-fast”. Some girls found fears of being offline were replaced by feelings of relief.”(more)

Educating girls: the key to tackling global poverty

The Guardian – Laura Paddison

“Access to education shouldn’t be determined by a child’s gender, yet 130 million girls globally are out of school and 15 million girls of primary school age will never even enter a classroom. Educating girls gives them the freedom to make decisions to improve their lives, which has deep social implications. Giving girls access to schooling is a central part of eradicating global poverty, according to the World Bank, which says better educated women tend to be healthier, participate more in formal labour markets, have fewer children and marry later. The UN’s sustainable development goals call for gender equality and a quality education for all by 2030.”(more)

How to improve the school results: not extra maths but music, loads of it

The Guardian – Josh Halliday

“Abiha Nasir, aged nine, walks quietly into the small classroom, takes a seat, adjusts her hijab and picks up the drumsticks. A shy smile spreads across her face as she begins to play. She was just five when she turned up at Feversham primary academy’s after-school clubs, leaving teachers astounded by her musical ability and how her confidence grew with an instrument in hand. Last year, Abiha successfully auditioned for Bradford’s gifted and talented music programme for primary school children, the first Muslim girl to do so. The assessor recorded only one word in her notes: “Wow!” Abiha’s teachers say her talent might have gone unspotted in many schools, where subjects such as music and art are being squeezed out by pressure to reach Sats targets and climb league tables.”(more)