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10 tips to boost executive function

E-School News – Martha Burns, Ph.D.

“Every day in the classroom, students are expected to engage in tasks such as paying attention to and remembering information, completing their work on time, waiting to speak until they’re called upon, and asking for help when they need it. If a child has difficulty with these tasks, executive function (EF) may be at the root of the issue.” (more)

Young children’s self-control influenced by peers

Education Dive – Linda Jacobson

“Self-control, one of several skills that falls under the category known as executive function, is shaped in early-childhood and influenced by what children think their friends are doing, according to a recent study from researchers at University of Colorado Boulder.” (more)

Study: Kids Who Struggle With Executive Function Vastly More Likely to Experience Academic Difficulties

The 74 Million – Kevin Mahnken

“Kindergartners who experience deficits in executive function — a set of cognitive skills that allow people to plan, solve problems, and control impulses — are much more likely to face academic difficulties in elementary school, according to a new working paper that was presented to the American Educational Research Association’s annual meeting Friday. In math alone, their odds of struggling by third grade are increased fivefold, authors find.” (more)

Strategies for Students With Scattered Minds

Edutopia – Dr. Donna Wilson and Dr. Marcus Conyers

“Imagine a team without a coach guiding players toward working together to execute a winning strategy. Imagine a company without a leader to make sure that employees across departments are equipped and organized to collaborate on continually improving products and increasing sales. Imagine a marching band without a drum major to lead musicians through their complicated maneuvers while staying on beat.”(more)

Bilingual preschoolers show stronger inhibitory control

Medical X-Press – Staff Writer

“For students in preschool, speaking two languages may be better than one, especially for developing inhibitory control—the ability to stop a hasty reflexive response and instead select a more adaptive response. That idea isn’t new, but a University of Oregon study took a longitudinal approach to examine the bilingual advantage hypothesis, which suggests that the demands associated with managing two languages confer cognitive advantages that extend beyond the language domain.”(more)

Why Executive Function Skills Take So Long To Fully Develop

KQED News Mind/Shift – Jon Hamilton

“Impulsive children become thoughtful adults only after years of improvements to the brain’s information highways, a team reports in Current Biology. A study of nearly 900 young people ages 8 to 22 found that the ability to control impulses, stay on task and make good decisions increased steadily over that span as the brain remodeled its information pathways to become more efficient. The finding helps explain why these abilities, known collectively as executive function, take so long to develop fully, says Danielle Bassett, an author of the study and an associate professor of bioengineering at the University of Pennsylvania.”(more)