RSI Corporate - Licensing

Study suggests an answer to young people’s persistent sleep problems

Medical X-Press – Mikhail Zinshteyn

“A collaborative research project involving James Cook University and the University of Queensland indicates high rates of sleep problems continuing through teenage years and into early adulthood – but also suggests a natural remedy. Dr. Yaqoot Fatima from JCU’s Mount Isa Centre for Rural and Remote Health was associated with a study that tracked more than 3600 people from the age of 14 until they were 21. “Just over a quarter of the 14-year-olds reported sleep problems, with more than 40 percent of those still having sleep problems at 21,” said Dr. Fatima. She said the causes of sleep problems were different at different ages.”(more)

Teenagers are as sedentary as 60-year-olds by age 19

The Washington Post – Ariana Eunjung Cha

“The adolescent years are when people’s bodies are supposed to start the ascent to their physical peak. Teenagers are growing like beanstalks. Their hormones are raging. They’re eager for new experiences. By all accounts, this should be among the most active periods in a person’s lifetime. Except it turns out it’s not. In an eye-opening study involving 12,529 Americans ages 6 to 85, researchers mapped how physical activity changes over a lifetime. The participants, part of the 2003-2004 and 2005-2006 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, wore accelerometers, devices that measure movement, for seven consecutive days. For the purposes of the analysis, researchers counted all types of movement, not just exercise.”(more)

Being more active in school lessons can improve performance in tests

Science Daily – Staff Writer

“Children who take part in lessons which include physical activity show an increase in health-enhancing physical activity and academic performance, according to research carried out by Leeds Beckett University. A team led by Senior Lecturer Andy Daly-Smith evaluated the impact of Tagtiv8 maths lessons on physical activity and maths performance. Children from a primary school in Leeds were randomly allocated to groups; taking part in either a seated classroom lesson or a Tagitv8 active learning lesson.”(more)

Study reveals meeting guidelines on TV time, physical activity and sleep duration lower BMI and body fat in children

Medical X-Press – Staff Writer

“New research presented at this year’s European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Porto, Portugal (17-20) May shows that achieving the guideline amounts of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity is associated with significantly lower BMI and body fat in children. The study was conducted by Dr Peter Katzmarzyk and Dr Amanda Staiano at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA. Excess weight and body fat are known to be risk factors for a range of serious health problems including diabetes, cancers, cardiovascular diseases, and even dementia. There is also increasing evidence that the harmful effects of high levels of adiposity begin to manifest themselves in childhood.”(more)

Follow concussion guidelines, but keep children active

The Seattle Times – The Seattle Times Editorial Board

“NEW research on how young athletes should be treated for concussions on and off the field is welcome news for both parents and coaches. But a Seattle doctor who was on the international research panel that created the 2017 Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sports hopes parents won’t use this information as a reason why their children shouldn’t be playing sports. Dr. Stanley Herring, director of the University of Washington Sports Health and Safety Institute, says exercise is essential to a child’s longterm health. The concussion protocols published last month in the British Journal of Sports Medicine are designed to keep athletes as safe as possible and all youth sports programs should adopt them. But parents also need to keep their kids active.”(more)

Study: 10 Minutes Of Vigorous Exercise A Day For Children Trims Waist Size, Reduces Diabetes Risk

Study Finds – Staff Writer

“Just 10 minutes of high-intensity physical exercise a day may significantly help overweight children decrease their risk of developing heart ailments or diabetes, a new study finds. Researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center studied data from children and teenagers who were part of the International Children’s Accelerometry Database — a consortium that pools accelerometer data from a multitude of studies conducted across the globe to create one larger sample size used for research. For this particular study, the authors examined 11,588 participants ages 4-18 from 11 studies that took place in the U.S., Brazil, and other European countries.”(more)