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Teenagers are as sedentary as 60-year-olds by age 19

The Washington Post – Ariana Eunjung Cha

“The adolescent years are when people’s bodies are supposed to start the ascent to their physical peak. Teenagers are growing like beanstalks. Their hormones are raging. They’re eager for new experiences. By all accounts, this should be among the most active periods in a person’s lifetime. Except it turns out it’s not. In an eye-opening study involving 12,529 Americans ages 6 to 85, researchers mapped how physical activity changes over a lifetime. The participants, part of the 2003-2004 and 2005-2006 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, wore accelerometers, devices that measure movement, for seven consecutive days. For the purposes of the analysis, researchers counted all types of movement, not just exercise.”(more)

Study reveals meeting guidelines on TV time, physical activity and sleep duration lower BMI and body fat in children

Medical X-Press – Staff Writer

“New research presented at this year’s European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Porto, Portugal (17-20) May shows that achieving the guideline amounts of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity is associated with significantly lower BMI and body fat in children. The study was conducted by Dr Peter Katzmarzyk and Dr Amanda Staiano at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA. Excess weight and body fat are known to be risk factors for a range of serious health problems including diabetes, cancers, cardiovascular diseases, and even dementia. There is also increasing evidence that the harmful effects of high levels of adiposity begin to manifest themselves in childhood.”(more)

Study: 10 Minutes Of Vigorous Exercise A Day For Children Trims Waist Size, Reduces Diabetes Risk

Study Finds – Staff Writer

“Just 10 minutes of high-intensity physical exercise a day may significantly help overweight children decrease their risk of developing heart ailments or diabetes, a new study finds. Researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center studied data from children and teenagers who were part of the International Children’s Accelerometry Database — a consortium that pools accelerometer data from a multitude of studies conducted across the globe to create one larger sample size used for research. For this particular study, the authors examined 11,588 participants ages 4-18 from 11 studies that took place in the U.S., Brazil, and other European countries.”(more)

Child’s Play Is Good for All of Us

The New York Times – Gretchen Reynolds

“If all of the children who currently are sedentary started exercising every day, societies could save enormous amounts of money in the coming decades and have healthier citizens as a whole, according to a remarkable new study. In the United States alone, we could expect to save more than $120 billion every year in health care and associated expenses.”(more)

Kids’ inactivity rises, creating ‘health care time bomb’

USA Today – Jayne O’Donnell and Joshua Mitchell

“The percent of children aged six to 12 who were physically active three or more times a week had its biggest drop in five years and is now under 25%, new data show. Making matters worse, households with incomes under $50,000 have much higher rates of inactivity than families making more than $75,000 annually, an analysis by the Sports and Fitness Industry Association and PHIT America found. In fact, low income Americans are getting more inactive while high income Americans are becoming more active.”(more)

We asked children why they don’t get enough exercise – here’s what they said

The Conversation – Helen Ingle and Susan Coan

“Getting children off the sofa, away from the TV and outside can be a challenging task for any parent, particularly in the age of increasingly sedentary and screen-focused lives. To stay healthy, it is currently recommended that children do at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity daily. But this has been in decline in recent years. And now only 21% of boys and 16% of girls in England are meeting current recommendations.”(more)