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The path to personalized learning is not straight

The Hechinger Report – Tara García Mathewson

“Three different districts. Three different time zones. Three different paths to the same general goal — personalized learning. Administrators from Henry County Schools, southwest of Atlanta; School District 51 in Mesa County, Colorado; and CICS West Belden, a Chicago International Charter School campus, discussed their efforts to personalize learning during a panel at the recent iNACOL symposium in Orlando, Florida. All were between three and four years into their work. “Personalized learning” is defined differently by many of the schools and districts that employ the model, but in general, it refers to a style of teaching and learning that prioritizes student wants and needs.”(more)

Gov. Jeb Bush — What Florida Can Teach America About Empowering Families Through Education Freedom

The 74 Million – Jeb Bush

“Without aspiration, our great country becomes just another country. And so it is disturbing when current surveys show that young people believe they will be worse off than their parents, and their parents agree with them. And when statistics reveal that those born into poverty are likely to remain stuck there, more so than at any time in our recent history.”(more)

When children are ready for school, they are ready for life

The Miami Herald – David Lawrence, Jr.

“As a new school year begins, more than 230,000 Florida children are stepping into kindergarten to begin their primary education, and perhaps 30 percent of them won’t really be ready to succeed. In Florida, age is the sole determining factor for entry into public kindergarten programs. But child education experts — and common sense — will tell you that age alone is not the best way to measure readiness.”(more)

Private School Choice Increases College Enrollment in Florida. Could It Work Nationally?

Education Next – Matthew M. Chingos and Daniel Kuehn

“The Trump administration has championed private school choice, but critics have pushed back, bolstering their arguments with evidence that such programs can lower student test scores. Our new report on a Florida private school choice program complicates this policy debate. Low-income students who used public dollars to attend private schools through the Florida Tax Credit (FTC) scholarship program enrolled in college at higher rates than their public school counterparts, according to our new study of more than 10,000 FTC participants. The FTC program, which is essentially a voucher program funded by business tax credits, is the largest private school choice program in the country and has been held up as a national model by advocates and policymakers.”(more)

U.S. Schools Brace For An Influx Of Students From Puerto Rico

NPR – Ariana Figueroa

“Nearly a week after Hurricane Maria battered Puerto Rico, students who can’t return to school may need to continue their education on the mainland. Some of the largest school districts in Florida, plus major cities like New York City and Chicago, are preparing for the possibility of an influx of students from the island. In South Florida, Miami-Dade County public schools are already working to accommodate students who need to transfer from Puerto Rico.”(more)

Analysis: After Disasters Like Harvey and Irma, the Road to a Child’s Emotional Recovery May Start at School

The 74 Million – Alison Crean Davis

“Andrew, Hugo, Katrina, Sandy, Harvey, and now Irma. We have some history in this country with educational systems striving to recover after they, and their cities, have been inundated with the devastating winds and rising floodwaters of hurricanes. Post-Harvey, the education headlines are focused on getting schools open and Houston’s students in the doors. It’s a critical start and consistent with stories that arose in the weeks and months after Katrina’s devastating hit on Louisiana: Schools needed to reopen, teachers and students were displaced, school systems and policies were being reconceived. But the recovery process can’t end with logistics, because the very children returning to these schools may present with varying symptoms of emotional trauma that could unfold over several years.”(more)