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‘The best way to learn a language is to immerse yourself in it’

The Irish Times – Ciara Kenny

“Learning a new language can seem like a mammoth challenge, but for those who are really intent on developing fluency, nothing beats full immersion by moving to the country where it is spoken day-to-day. Ahead of European Day of Languages on September 26th, readers living around the world share their experiences of the frustration and joy of learning a new tongue.” (more)

13 language-learning tips from Bates faculty and students

Bates – Emily McConville

“Learning a new language opens up career prospects, richer travel experiences, and opportunities to communicate with people. It also helps you see your own culture from a different perspective. “You won’t know your own culture or language until you learn another language or culture,” says Keiko Konoeda, a lecturer in Japanese whose research focuses on teaching languages.” (more)

Real-life learning the key to mastering a second language

The South China Morning Post – John Cremer

“Noting such concerns, Lai Chun, an associate professor in the University of Hong Kong’s (HKU) faculty of education, points out that most second language curricula and textbooks used in international schools now pay more attention to developing learners’ “communicative functions”. However, there is still room to improve the relevance of topics to students’ daily life and interests, which is an important factor in increasing overall motivation. “The essentials for reaching near-native levels of fluency are sufficient exposure to the language and opportunities to use it in authentic contexts,” Lai says.” (more)

Dynamic assessment can help language learners have more success

Phys Org – Jim Carlson

“Altering or individualizing assessment procedures can propel second-language learners toward more successful mastery of that language, ongoing research by Penn State Associate Professor of Education Matt Poehner and his interdisciplinary team suggests. Poehner’s interdisciplinary work is centered on dynamic assessment, which seeks to identify the skills that students possess as well as their learning potential, to paint a broader picture of a person’s capabilities. Instead of assigning a student a specific task and simply watching him or her complete it, dynamic assessment entails helpful intervention when problems surface.” (more)

COLUMN: Being multilingual is more important than people think

The Indiana Daily Student – Tejus Arora

“Language is at the core of human existence. It’s the medium through which we perceive the world around us, express our perception, establish and maintain relationships and create a community. It cultivates value and a global working economy. Now imagine you knew more than one language to perceive, express, create, learn, teach and so on. Your perception of the world would widen, your avenues of information intake would increase; your personal enrichment would be unparalleled by your monolingual peers.” (more)

Kiwis be warned: the global jobs market demands polyglots

Stuff – Simon Draper

“The Asia New Zealand Foundation knows from our work with schools that children who are bilingual find it easier to acquire further languages and become multilingual. We have visited schools in Gisborne and Taranaki with children who are already bilingual in te reo and English. Their teachers have been struck by how easily these students have picked up Mandarin. Multilingualism is normal in much of the world, and young people lap up the opportunity to learn new languages if they are in the right environment. But here in New Zealand, the reality is that students are often forced to choose between te reo and another language when they are given choices. If New Zealand wants to raise global citizens, then students need to know where they stand in the world, and knowing who they are as New Zealanders is a fundamental part of that.” (more)