Renascence School Education News - private school

Monday, April 20, 2015

Girls face ‘sharp rise in emotional problems’

BBC – Smitha Mundasad

“The number of schoolgirls at risk of emotional problems has risen sharply, an English study in the Journal of Adolescent Health suggests. Scientists analysed questionnaires completed by 1,600 pupils aged 11-13 in 2009, comparing them with similar surveys conducted five years later. They were “surprised” by a 7% spike in girls reporting emotional issues while boys’ answers remained fairly stable. Charities are concerned pressures are particularly affecting girls. Scientists found that social, peer and behavioural problems remained relatively constant for boys and girls across the five years. But the rise in emotional issues reported by girls suggested they faced unique pressures, the researchers suggested. They said reasons behind this could include a drive to achieve unrealistic body images perpetuated by social media and an increasing sexualisation of young women.”(more)

Thursday, April 16, 2015

How to Educate the Next Generation of Googlers: Two Lessons From the White House Science Fair

The Huffington Post – Nick Hutchinson

“By 2022, the U.S. will need more than nine million professionals in science, technology, engineering and math. But last year, there were eleven states where not a single African-American student took the Advanced Placement exam in computer science — and fewer than twenty percent of all test takers were female. Gender and ethnic inequality in tech is, by now, well documented. The question is what can we do about it? Last month, I had a chance to meet the next generation of tech superstars at The White House Science Fair, a gathering of America’s brightest young minds and a demonstration that there’s nothing inevitable about tech’s diversity crisis. These students had made important discoveries in cybersecurity and cancer research…For a country famously lagging in math and science, how did we produce students like these — and how can we produce more of them? I found two key themes in the many dozens of well-rehearsed presentations:”(more)

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

The 5 Biases Pushing Women Out of STEM

Harvard Business Review – Joan C. Williams

“By now, we’ve all heard about the low numbers of American women in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Some argue it’s a pipeline issue – that if we can interest more young girls in STEM subjects, the issue will resolve itself over time. But that’s not convincing. After all, the percentage of women in computer science has actually decreased since 1991. Another theory is that women are choosing to forgo careers in STEM to attain better work-family balance—rather than being pushed out by bias. But evidence for that is also thin. Several new studies add to the growing body of evidence that documents the role of gender bias in driving women out of science careers…My own new research, co-authored with Kathrine W. Phillips and Erika V. Hall, also indicates that bias, not pipeline issues or personal choices, pushes women out of science – and that bias plays out differently depending on a woman’s race or ethnicity…It’s so tempting the attribute the paucity of women in STEM to pipeline problems or personal choices. But it’s time to listen to women scientists: they think the issue’s gender bias, and an increasing amount of research supports that view. If organizations are truly interested in retaining and advancing women, they will approach the issue of gender bias the same way they do other business issues: develop objective metrics and hold themselves to meeting them.”(more)

Monday, March 30, 2015

The Gender Gap in Reading

Education Next – Tom Loveless

“This week marks the release of the 2015 Brown Center Report on American Education, the fourteenth issue of the series. One of the three studies in the report, “Girls, Boys, and Reading,” examines the gender gap in reading. Girls consistently outscore boys on reading assessments. They have for a long time. A 1942 study in Iowa discovered that girls were superior to boys on tests of reading comprehension, vocabulary, and basic language skills. [i] Girls have outscored boys on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) reading assessments since the first NAEP was administered in 1971. I hope you’ll read the full study—and the other studies in the report—but allow me to summarize the main findings of the gender gap study here.”(more)

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Young Girls Are Much, Much Better Readers Than Boys, And Have Been For A Long Time

The Huffington Post – Rebecca Klein

“The gap between boys’ and girls’ respective reading abilities has been getting a lot of attention lately, but the trend itself is not new. Girls have been better readers than boys for a long, long time, according to a report released Tuesday by the Brown Center on Education Policy at the Brookings Institution. The annual report analyzes three topics in contemporary education through the lens of up-to-date research. This year, the report looked at the effectiveness of the Common Core state standards, the relationship between student engagement and academic achievement, and the gender gap in reading. Below are three key insights into gender gaps the report provided:.”(more)

Saturday, March 28, 2015

Boys More Likely Than Girls to Underperform Academically

The U.S. News – Allie Bidwell

“There’s an education gap in academic performance, but it’s not the one you’re probably thinking about. Male students are significantly more likely than female students to be less engaged with school, to have low skills and poor academic achievement, to leave school early and to be overall low achievers in reading, math and science, according to a new report from the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development, or OECD. The report analyzes the scores of 15-year-old students on the Programme for International Student Assessment exam over time to determine why boys are more likely to fail to meet baseline requirements for proficiency in those three core subjects. Across more than 30 OECD countries in 2012, 14 percent of boys and 9 percent of girls did not meet baseline-level proficiency in any of the three core subjects, the report found.”(more)

Friday, March 27, 2015

Educators Can Boost Women’s Role in Computing, Engineering, Report Says

Education Week – Benjamin Herold

“Women remain dramatically underrepresented in the fields of engineering and computing, necessitating a wide range of strategies to minimize gender bias…In 2013, just 26 percent of computing professionals and 12 percent of working engineers were women, according to the AAUW, a Washington-based nonprofit advocacy group…The group’s report, “Solving the Equation: The Variables for Women’s Success in Engineering and Computing,” cites a wide range of research indicating that it is students’ interest in STEM, not their performance in related academic subjects, that is most closely associated with their pursuit of degrees and careers in engineering and computing”…The AAUW recommends that employers and universities address a range of “structural and cultural barriers” to greater female involvement in computing and engineering…”(more)

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Young Girls Are Much, Much Better Readers Than Boys, And Have Been For A Long Time

The Huffington Post – Rebecca Klein

“The gap between boys’ and girls’ respective reading abilities has been getting a lot of attention lately, but the trend itself is not new. Girls have been better readers than boys for a long, long time, according to a report released Tuesday by the Brown Center on Education Policy at the Brookings Institution. The annual report analyzes three topics in contemporary education through the lens of up-to-date research. This year, the report looked at the effectiveness of the Common Core state standards, the relationship between student engagement and academic achievement, and the gender gap in reading. Below are three key insights into gender gaps the report provided:”(more)

Sunday, March 22, 2015

Nicky Morgan: girls who study maths and science go on to earn a third more in wages

The Telegraph – Rosa Prince

” Girls who take maths and science at A-level will go on earn a third more in wages than those who stick to the arts and humanities, new research has found. Nicky Morgan, the Education Secretary, said the data produced by the consultancy London Economics showed the importance of encouraging female pupils to take STEM subjects – science, technology, engineering and maths – as a means of closing the gender pay gap. Girls who take just one STEM A-level will see their wages rise by as much as £4,500 a year on average, while those who sit two maths or science subjects are predicted to experience a pay boost of 33.1 per cent. In contrast, boys who take two STEM A-levels are expected to earn less than eight per cent more on average than those who focus on other subjects.”(more)

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Gender Gap in Education Cuts Both Ways

The New York Times – Matt Precey

“Why do the best-educated girls do worse at math than top-educated boys? Concern about this deficit exploded into public consciousness 35 years ago, when researchers in the department of psychology at Johns Hopkins University published an article suggesting the gap might be caused by a “superior male mathematical ability.” The debate that ensued was furious. It was so hot that a quarter of a century later, a similar controversy contributed to the ouster of Lawrence Summers from his post as the president of Harvard. Was there anything “natural” about the performance gap? Or was it the product of gender bias working its way through schools? As the debate raged, ending the underrepresentation of women in science, technology, engineering and math became a critical policy priority. Amid the din over top girls’ mathematical abilities, something important was forgotten: What is happening that so many boys are falling behind in pretty much everything else?.”(more)