Renascence School Education News - private school

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Michelle Obama heads to Asia to promote girls’ education

Reuters – Susan Heavey

“First Lady Michelle Obama will travel to Japan and Cambodia this month as part of a U.S. global effort to support education for girls, the White House said on Tuesday. She will visit Tokyo and Kyoto in Japan from March 18 to March 20, and the Cambodian city of Siem Reap from March 21 to 22, it said in a statement. The initiative aims to reduce the number of girls – 62 million worldwide – who do not attend school in an effort to improve their financial stability, health and well-being, according to the administration. The effort, launched last summer through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), will utilize the Peace Corps volunteer program to help expand access for schooling for girls, especially for teenagers. Senior Obama Adviser Valerie Jarrett on Tuesday said corps volunteers will recruit and train other local volunteers and push other community efforts in nearly a dozen countries.”(more)

Monday, March 2, 2015

6 Things You Should Know About Young Girls in School

Time – Lisa Friedman

“One day your child feels like part of the gang; the next she’s been elbowed out of the lunch table or left off the invitation list for a birthday party. Here’s what you need to know to get her through the clique years—and endless exclusive photo tagging—with fewer scars.”(more)

Saturday, February 28, 2015

Guide for parents to help girls consider male-dominated careers

The Guardian – Mark Tran

“Girls should be encouraged to embrace subjects that open doors to traditionally male-dominated sectors, according to a new guide from the Government Equalities Office. Your Daughter’s Future, developed with the help of girls aged 12 to 16, sets out what support girls want from their parents as they weigh up exam and career options. It offers parents information on which GCSEs and A-levels to consider for different careers and contains tips on organising workplace visits to gain experience, managing exam stress and boosting confidence, with tailored information for different ages. The guide encourages parents to inspire their daughters with role models and case studies. “The most effective role models are ordinary people who you know in your day-to-day life – who your daughter can talk to and may aspire to be like,” says the guide, directing parents to websites such as Sciencegrrl and organisations such as the Institution of Engineering and Technology.”(more)

Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Engineer’s Week: Prioritizing Women in STEM Today and Moving Forward

The Huffington Post – Claire Topalian

“Despite consistent growth in the STEM job market over the past 10 years, we still see a disparate number of young women entering STEM fields. In a recent article, Girl Scouts CEO Anna Maria Chavez explains, “While women comprise 48 percent of the U.S. workforce, just 24 percent are in STEM fields, a statistic that has held constant for nearly a decade.” Just last year, major tech companies made their diversity numbers public, revealing that only 17 percent of Google’s team is comprised of women, and at Facebook just 15 percent. These numbers are likely related to another data point: while women make up 57% of U.S. College students, only 18 percent earn computer science degrees. These numbers ultimately leave us asking the same questions: What might account for the lack of women in STEM, why do companies benefit from hiring more women in STEM, and what can be done to encourage young women to pursue careers in STEM-related fields? Tackling the first question — what might account for the lack of women in STEM — is the most difficult one to answer in tangible terms. The root causes of such an issue would require an in-depth approach that includes an assessment of sociological implications — something that most of us aren’t equipped to discuss holistically let alone begin to solve. It is perhaps more useful, then, to focus not on the problem so much as the solution and the reasons why it is so important to strive towards a solution.”(more)

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Campaigns to Encourage Girls in STEM Fields Must Begin Early

Education News – Grace Smith

“Several theories exist about why women are underrepresented in math and science jobs. Parents and toy-makers discourage girls from studying the two subjects, as do teachers…The lack of role-models for girls in those fields has girls growing up thinking they would not succeed in them. A study published this week by the National Bureau of Economic Research, which has pointed out that teachers have unconscious biases, has shown how powerful a bit of encouragement can be. It posits that early education experiences can influence success in math and science courses that students later choose, and ultimately can effect the jobs they get and the size of their salaries. The effect becomes more dramatic when families have a more educated father then mother and for girls from lower-income families, says the study. Many of the fastest growing and highest paying fields, like computer science and engineering, could be entered by girls if teachers could reverse their feelings that boys alone should fill these professions.”(more)

Saturday, February 14, 2015

Girls Edging Out Boys in STEM Course-Taking, But Not Test Performance

Education Week – Sarah D. Sparks

“The gender gap in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics may be starting to turn, according to new 2009 data from the National Center for Education Statistics. The data is coming at a time when states and districts are in a big push to get more students—and particularly girls—into STEM careers, via everything from mentorships and clubs to STEM-only schools. By 12th grade, girls in 2009 were more likely than boys to have earned credit in advanced math and science, including Algebra II, chemistry, biology, and health sciences, though boys are significantly more likely to earn credit in computer science and engineering. Why then, does the data also show that girls continued to underperform in small but persistent ways across several STEM-related parts of the National Assessment of Educational Progress?.”(more)

Friday, February 13, 2015

The Next Generation of Women in STEM

Diplomatic Courier – David Chavern

“The word “engineer” is derived from two Latin terms meaning “to devise” and “cleverness.” Contrary to popular perception, successful “engineering” has always required creativity and lots of out-of-the-box thinking…STEM careers have been traditionally male-dominated, with a number of barriers—some cultural, some more overt—that have impeded the retention and advancement of women in STEM fields. But empirical evidence tells us that companies with higher levels of gender diversity perform better than their competitors…smart businesses create a corporate culture from the top down that paves the road for more women in STEM at all levels. Diversity in hiring—and thinking—has to first and foremost be championed by the board and the CEO. Then they, in turn, have to work to root out unseen and misunderstood biases throughout the organization and, very importantly, hold people accountable. Again, this isn’t just a social good or a “nice thing to do.” It is a business imperative for companies that are in a war for talent…But this is not enough; we all have to do our part to make sure unseen and misunderstood biases in the home and school are rooted out, and that all young women with an interest in and talent for STEM fields have a chance to learn and succeed. We can’t just complain. We need to buy more GoldieBlox for the young girls in our lives!”(more)

Thursday, February 12, 2015

Girls Edging Out Boys in STEM Course-Taking, but not Test Performance

Education Week – Sarah D. Sparks

“The gender gap in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics may be starting to turn, according to new 2009 data from the National Center for Education Statistics. The data is coming at a time when states and districts are in a big push to get more students—and particularly girls—into STEM careers, via everything from mentorships and clubs to STEM-only schools. By 12th grade, girls in 2009 were more likely than boys to have earned credit in advanced math and science, including Algebra II, chemistry, biology, and health sciences, though boys are significantly more likely to earn credit in computer science and engineering. Why then, does the data also show that girls continued to underperform in small but persistent ways across several STEM-related parts of the National Assessment of Educational Progress?”(more)

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Schoolgirls Are Facing More Threats, U.N. Reports

The New York Times – Rick Gladston

“Attacks against girls attending school or seeking access to education appear to be increasing around the world despite legal protections of gender equality, the United Nations said in a report issued on Monday. The report, posted on the website of the United Nations Human Rights Council, said attacks on schools have occurred in at least 70 countries from 2009 to 2014, and that many of the attacks were “specifically directed at girls, parents and teachers advocating for gender equality in education”…The report, conducted by the Women’s Human Rights and Gender section of the Human Rights Council, was an assessment based on a compilation of research, including by other United Nations agencies and outside rights groups and academics.”(more)

Monday, February 9, 2015

Evolution: On STEM education

The Redlands Daily Facts – Jane Roberts

“I just barely passed algebra in the ninth grade. Got a C even with tutoring from my mother, who had taught math in Junior High. I had a better time with geometry in the 10th grade thanks to both an excellent teacher and again to my mother. I then forswore any more of that “terrible math.” I did get a good grade and liked a class in human anatomy as a high school senior. I never took chemistry or biology in high school. In college at San Diego State (1958 to 1962) I took two required general science courses, one in what I would call “descriptive biology,” recognizing different animal species. It was difficult for me to remember all the details. I got a B or C—a C I think. The other course was physical science where we studied the basic laws of physics, astronomy, gravity, Boyle’s law, and the difference between nuclear fission and fusion. At least that is what I remember. I was so afraid of failing that course that I studied like crazy. The tests in that course had all been multiple choice and that is what we expected for the final. But the professor announced to the 100 or so students assembled that someone had stolen a copy of the exam, that therefore it was now an essay test and that when we handed in our tests we were to show our student I.D.s so he could match the class list with those taking the test. Two students got up and walked out. I’m absolutely sure I got the best grade in the class, knew everything by heart, knew how to explain everything. I got an A. I never took any math in college but we did have to pass a proficiency test in order to get our diplomas. Again, I was petrified but somehow with some kind of innate common sense and some memory of a few basic things, I passed.”(more)