RSI Corporate - Licensing

What STEM Companies Can Do To Build A More Gender-Balanced Workforce

Forbes – MeiMei Fox

“Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation is a non-profit organization that uses 100% of its donations to fund young scientists in pursuing innovative cancer research. Since its founding in 1946, the Foundation has invested over $360 million in funding more than 3,700 researchers. As the President and CEO of Damon Runyon, Dr. Yung S. Lie is making it her mission to promote STEM education and encourage more women to enter into science, technology, engineering, and math-related careers. She is well on her way. Today, approximately 42% of Damon Runyon’s 212 actively-funded scientists are women, which is well above the world average of 30%.” (more)

Class clowns: Playful boys viewed more negatively than playful girls, study finds

Science Daily – Staff Writer

“New research shows that playful boys are viewed as rebellious and disruptive by their 1st, 2nd, and 3rd grade teachers whereas playful girls are not. As a result of observing teachers’ attempts to discourage the expression of playfulness, the boys’ classmates changed their view of these “class clowns” from initially positive to increasingly negative. The playful boys also developed more negative perceptions of themselves over time. The study, published in Frontiers in Psychology, indicates that teachers’ negative perceptions of playful boys in their early school years may forebode a longer-term negative trajectory for the boys as they continue through their formal school years.” (more)

Analysis: Why Are All the Stories About Boys Falling Behind Girls at School Ignoring the Forces Keeping Them There?

The 74 Million – Richard Whitmire

“A recent flurry of articles on boys falling behind in school do a great job laying out the facts — but fall short when it comes to asking the right questions. Take the recent Atlantic piece as an example. Great facts, all accurate: As of 2015, 72.5 percent of females who recently graduated from high school were enrolled in college, versus 65.8 percent of men (compared to 1967 when 57 percent of the males were in college and 47.2 percent of the females.). This is important stuff. Today, at a time when college has become the new high school as many employers demand college degrees for jobs that don’t truly need those skills, there are 2.2 million more women than men in college.”(more)

Closing the tech gender gap starts in childhood

The Guardian – Jessica Bateman

“The tech industry’s gender imbalance is no secret – only 17% of technology specific jobs are held by women. Projects to counter the problem, from conferences to mentorship programmes, are becoming widespread but are usually aimed at women already embarking on careers. Could we be doing more to close this gap during childhood? There is overwhelming evidence that our early years are crucial in shaping how we see the world and our place in it. From as early as 10 or 11, children already have strong ideas about their gender roles. According to Elle Boag, a social psychologist at Birmingham City University, children as young as seven may have ideas about the different types of job men and women should do.”(more)

Parents’ early word choices can widen STEM gender gap

Medical X-Press – Staff Writer

“The gender gap in STEM can start when children are just learning to speak – the words parents choose to describe their child’s world could be the reason boys are outpacing girls, according to a new study. However, girls don’t start out at a disadvantage. Findings show boys are hearing spatial language at higher rates than girls and, by default, using it more as they grow. Early use of spatial language – the words and ways people describe things, people and places – can be a predictor of success in science, technology, engineering and math fields later in life, according to Shannon M. Pruden, Florida International University psychology professor and lead author of the study.”(more)

Girls outnumber boys in charter schools, study shows. Here’s why that matters.

Chalk Beat – Matt Barnum

“Look around an average charter school. The difference may be too small to be perceptible, but you might notice a few more girls than boys. That is the provocative finding of a study released late last year examining data from charter schools across the country, with a focus on North Carolina and the KIPP network of charter schools. The results re-open the long-standing debate on whether charter schools exclude or push out certain types of students.”(more)