Renascence School Education News - private school

Monday, March 30, 2015

The Gender Gap in Reading

Education Next – Tom Loveless

“This week marks the release of the 2015 Brown Center Report on American Education, the fourteenth issue of the series. One of the three studies in the report, “Girls, Boys, and Reading,” examines the gender gap in reading. Girls consistently outscore boys on reading assessments. They have for a long time. A 1942 study in Iowa discovered that girls were superior to boys on tests of reading comprehension, vocabulary, and basic language skills. [i] Girls have outscored boys on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) reading assessments since the first NAEP was administered in 1971. I hope you’ll read the full study—and the other studies in the report—but allow me to summarize the main findings of the gender gap study here.”(more)

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Young Girls Are Much, Much Better Readers Than Boys, And Have Been For A Long Time

The Huffington Post – Rebecca Klein

“The gap between boys’ and girls’ respective reading abilities has been getting a lot of attention lately, but the trend itself is not new. Girls have been better readers than boys for a long, long time, according to a report released Tuesday by the Brown Center on Education Policy at the Brookings Institution. The annual report analyzes three topics in contemporary education through the lens of up-to-date research. This year, the report looked at the effectiveness of the Common Core state standards, the relationship between student engagement and academic achievement, and the gender gap in reading. Below are three key insights into gender gaps the report provided:.”(more)

Saturday, March 28, 2015

Boys More Likely Than Girls to Underperform Academically

The U.S. News – Allie Bidwell

“There’s an education gap in academic performance, but it’s not the one you’re probably thinking about. Male students are significantly more likely than female students to be less engaged with school, to have low skills and poor academic achievement, to leave school early and to be overall low achievers in reading, math and science, according to a new report from the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development, or OECD. The report analyzes the scores of 15-year-old students on the Programme for International Student Assessment exam over time to determine why boys are more likely to fail to meet baseline requirements for proficiency in those three core subjects. Across more than 30 OECD countries in 2012, 14 percent of boys and 9 percent of girls did not meet baseline-level proficiency in any of the three core subjects, the report found.”(more)

Friday, March 27, 2015

Educators Can Boost Women’s Role in Computing, Engineering, Report Says

Education Week – Benjamin Herold

“Women remain dramatically underrepresented in the fields of engineering and computing, necessitating a wide range of strategies to minimize gender bias…In 2013, just 26 percent of computing professionals and 12 percent of working engineers were women, according to the AAUW, a Washington-based nonprofit advocacy group…The group’s report, “Solving the Equation: The Variables for Women’s Success in Engineering and Computing,” cites a wide range of research indicating that it is students’ interest in STEM, not their performance in related academic subjects, that is most closely associated with their pursuit of degrees and careers in engineering and computing”…The AAUW recommends that employers and universities address a range of “structural and cultural barriers” to greater female involvement in computing and engineering…”(more)

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Young Girls Are Much, Much Better Readers Than Boys, And Have Been For A Long Time

The Huffington Post – Rebecca Klein

“The gap between boys’ and girls’ respective reading abilities has been getting a lot of attention lately, but the trend itself is not new. Girls have been better readers than boys for a long, long time, according to a report released Tuesday by the Brown Center on Education Policy at the Brookings Institution. The annual report analyzes three topics in contemporary education through the lens of up-to-date research. This year, the report looked at the effectiveness of the Common Core state standards, the relationship between student engagement and academic achievement, and the gender gap in reading. Below are three key insights into gender gaps the report provided:”(more)

Sunday, March 22, 2015

Nicky Morgan: girls who study maths and science go on to earn a third more in wages

The Telegraph – Rosa Prince

” Girls who take maths and science at A-level will go on earn a third more in wages than those who stick to the arts and humanities, new research has found. Nicky Morgan, the Education Secretary, said the data produced by the consultancy London Economics showed the importance of encouraging female pupils to take STEM subjects – science, technology, engineering and maths – as a means of closing the gender pay gap. Girls who take just one STEM A-level will see their wages rise by as much as £4,500 a year on average, while those who sit two maths or science subjects are predicted to experience a pay boost of 33.1 per cent. In contrast, boys who take two STEM A-levels are expected to earn less than eight per cent more on average than those who focus on other subjects.”(more)

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Gender Gap in Education Cuts Both Ways

The New York Times – Matt Precey

“Why do the best-educated girls do worse at math than top-educated boys? Concern about this deficit exploded into public consciousness 35 years ago, when researchers in the department of psychology at Johns Hopkins University published an article suggesting the gap might be caused by a “superior male mathematical ability.” The debate that ensued was furious. It was so hot that a quarter of a century later, a similar controversy contributed to the ouster of Lawrence Summers from his post as the president of Harvard. Was there anything “natural” about the performance gap? Or was it the product of gender bias working its way through schools? As the debate raged, ending the underrepresentation of women in science, technology, engineering and math became a critical policy priority. Amid the din over top girls’ mathematical abilities, something important was forgotten: What is happening that so many boys are falling behind in pretty much everything else?.”(more)

Monday, March 16, 2015

Michelle Obama Wants To Help Girls Around The World Get An Education

The Huffington Post – Paige Lavender

“First Lady Michelle Obama announced a new effort called “Let Girls Learn” to help girls around the world get access to education. In a Wall Street Journal op-ed published Monday, Obama said she will join Akie Abe, wife of Japanese Prime Minister Shinzō Abe, to “announce a new partnership to educate girls across the globe” this week in Tokyo. Obama said it’s critical other countries contribute in order to make an impact. “[G]iven the magnitude of the challenge, U.S. action alone will not suffice, nor will the efforts of just a few concerned countries,” Obama wrote. “That is why this week in Japan, we will call for countries around the world to join us by making their own investments to help girls learn.'”(more)

Wednesday, March 11, 2015

No, Science Isn’t ‘A Boy Thing.’ And These Genius Girls Prove It

The Huffington Post – Robbie Couch

“Science isn’t just for one gender — just ask the girls in Microsoft’s new ad. Despite their young ages, they all have impressive scientific accomplishments under their belts. But they also admit that society hasn’t created a world where their academic interest is easily accessible for students like them…Microsoft’s ad — which was launched in honor of International Women’s Day on Sunday — addresses the gender gap when it comes to students pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). According to the ad, seven out of 10 girls are interested in science, but only two out of 10 will pursue a career in a related field.”(more)

Monday, March 9, 2015

All Girls Deserve Education Beyond Primary

Time – Malala Yousafzai

“When we imagine the power of all our sisters standing together on the shoulders of a quality education — our joy knows no bounds. Who inspires you? Over the last year I’ve been honored to travel and meet some exceptional girls. These young women won’t let anything stand in the way of their education. They inspire me. Amina is one such girl. I met Amina last summer when I traveled to Nigeria. Her home in northern Nigeria is a place where education is under attack by Boko Haram. Despite the always present threat of violence and the fact that girls hardly ever attend secondary school, Amina persisted — she stood up for her right to an education. I know firsthand that the act of simply showing up at school is dangerous. It takes courage.”(more)