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International Day Of Women & Girls In Science Highlights Neuroscience Is Our Future

Forbes – Nicole Fisher

“Last weekend global leaders in science, technology and diplomacy gathered at the United Nations and universities around the world for the 3rd Annual International Day of Women and Girls in Science. The overall platform aims to mobilize women in a wide range of science disciplines, contributing to achievement of Sustainable Development Goals and the UN’s 2030 Development Agenda. When only 30% of the world’s researchers are women, this call for educational awareness and advocacy could not be more important to global public health.” (more)

International Day of Women and Girls in Science encourages girls to consider STEM

The Toronto Star – Fatima Syed

“Held at Facebook headquarters in Toronto, the event served as the launch of the federal government’s second phase of its plan to encourage increased female participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). The next phase is called “Choose Science” — a digital campaign sharing why women chose to work in the sciences. The aim is to create a network of mentors to inspire future female STEM leaders. “We need to include all people to make sure we have the right answers for our future, and if you only have men making those decisions that’s not good,” said Kate Young, parliamentary secretary for science. “(Young girls) do need to hear these stories to know there’s a place for (them).” In 1987, only 20 per cent of the people working in STEM fields were female, a number that has moved up to just 22 per cent today. Just 29.6 per cent of individuals with a post-secondary STEM credential and 26.9 per cent of those employed in a STEM-intensive occupation in Canada are women.” (more)

The urgent need to get more women involved in technology

The Toronto Star – Katherine Manuel

“There is a problem in the technology sector that too few are tackling, let alone talking about. A recent Brookfield report found only 9 per cent of software developers in Canada are female. Women’s participation in the technology sector has remained between 23 per cent and 25 per cent for well over a decade.” (more)

Expansion of AP computer science draws more girls and minorities

The Seattle Times – Nick Anderson

“Ten years ago, girls were so scarce in high school computer science classes that the number of female students taking Advanced Placement tests in that subject could be counted on one hand in nine states. In five others, there were none. Latino and African-American students were also in short supply, a problem that has bedeviled educators for years and hindered efforts to diversify the high-tech workforce.” (more)

Diversity at the front of the classroom could mean more diversity among future scientists

The Hechinger Report – Tara García Mathewson

“Lithium, the element, burns red. The flame for sodium is a strong orange. With potassium, it’s pink. Before he did a flame test in his chemistry class at Woodrow Wilson High School in Camden, N.J., 16-year-old Naysaan Benson thought fire only had two colors – orange and red. The experiment surprised him. “There was green, red, orange, yellow,” Benson said. Now he understands how fireworks get their color.” (more)

Girls Can Change the World—But We Have to Invest in Them First

Time- Malala Yousafzai

“One hundred and thirty million girls are out of school. As I travel the world to advocate for them, not every day is easy. Some days I meet girls who have to fight so hard for a right they already have. This summer I met Najlaa, a Yazidi teenager in Iraq. At 14, her parents took her out of school and told her she would be married.”(more)