RSI Corporate - Licensing

New Stanford education study shows where boys and girls do better in math, English

Stanford University – Krysten Crawford

“When Stanford Professor Sean Reardon and his research team set out to take an unprecedented look at how elementary school girls and boys compare in academic achievement, they expected to find similar stereotype-driven patterns across all 10,000 U.S. school districts: boys consistently outperforming girls in math and girls steadily surpassing boys in reading and writing by a wide margin.” (more)

Girls more likely to be bullied than boys, English schools survey finds

The Guardian – Richard Adams

“Girls are much more likely than boys to be bullied at school, with almost twice as many on the receiving end of cyberbullying and social exclusion by other pupils, according to a government study. The figures from a survey of 10,000 pupils at schools in England in year 11 – children aged 15 or 16 – revealed a decline in reports of bullying overall and particularly in incidents of violent bullying, which mainly affects boys.” (more)

STEM: Girls Just Wanna Have Games!

Education World – Staff Writer

“Doom, Duke Nukem, Abe’s Oddysee, Driver, Enter the Matrix…I watched as my husband and his business partners launched some of the biggest games in the world. “Is this just a guy thing?” I wondered. What about girls? Girls wanna play games, too. “There is no market for girl games,” explained the male marketing director. “Oh really?” Flash forward a decade or so. How do we feel about girls and games today? How do we feel about our STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) issues? And how do we feel about using games to help students grasp difficult math and science concepts–games that let them actively engage with learning?” (more)

Boys’ interest in STEM is decreasing, new study says

The Denver Post – Natalie Weber

“STEM — which stands for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics — encompasses a range of fields that fall under this umbrella, including careers in areas such as computer science and civil engineering. Only 24 percent of boys are interested in a career in STEM, as compared to 36 percent in 2017, according to the survey administered on behalf of Junior Achievement and Ernst & Young LLP. Girls’ interest remained stable, though low, with 11 percent interested in a STEM-related career.” (more)

Is STEM getting ‘IT’ right for female students?

E-School News – Richard Gerver

“March 8th was memorable for many reasons. Not only was it International Women’s Day, but Meghan Markle made one of her first official public appearances with her future husband, Prince Harry, at an event in Birmingham, England. Significantly, the event was organized by the STEMettes, an award-winning social enterprise working across the U.K. and Ireland to inspire young women to pursue STEM careers.” (more)

Screening may miss signs of autism, especially in girls: study

Medical X-Press – Dennis Thompson

“An important checklist used to screen for autism can miss subtle clues in some children, delaying their eventual diagnosis. Researchers found that the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers, or M-CHAT, can fail to detect developmental delays that are tell-tale signs of autism in 18-month-olds, according to findings published in the June issue of the journal Pediatrics.” (more)