RSI Corporate - Licensing

Using the U.N.’s Sustainable Development Goals

Edutopia – Jodie Deinhammer

“Each year I start out with the same question for my students: What is the biggest issue you think our world faces, and what can we do to solve it? This challenge-based learning approach allows my students to design our class and focus on real-world issues. With their ideas, we build our class projects together. Students next identify a problem in our own community. We discuss all of their ideas and then look at the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Using this resource, we investigate the problems they identify and compare them to world issues. For example, a few years ago, students decided that childhood obesity was a problem in our community.”(more)

UN warns ‘no progress’ on 260 million missing school places

BBC – Sean Coughlan

“Global pledges to provide education for all young people show little chance of being achieved, according to annual figures from the United Nations. There are 264 million young people without access to school, with few signs of progress, says Unesco. Around the world, almost one in 10 children does not even have access to primary level education. The UN agency says wider access to education would radically reduce poverty and improve security. The annual Global Education Monitoring Report tracks the numbers of young people in school and measures progress in international promises to ensure access to education.”(more)

Language Study as a National Imperative

Inside Higher Ed – Colleen Flaherty

“A major 2013 report from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences warned that at “the very moment when China and some European nations are seeking to replicate our model of broad education,” including the humanities, the U.S. was instead “narrowing” its focus and abandoning its “sense of what education has been and should continue to be.” The paper caught the attention of policy makers, including members of Congress. Four Republicans and four Democrats asked the AAAS to dig deeper into the state of language education in the U.S. They wanted to know what the U.S. could do to ensure excellence in language education, especially how it might more efficiently use existing resources. They also asked how language learning influences economic growth, cultural diplomacy, productivity for future generations and a sense of personal fulfillment.”(more)

Singapore tops global education rankings

BBC – Sean Coughlan

“Singapore has the highest-achieving primary and secondary pupils in international education tests in maths and science. But primary school pupils in Northern Ireland were ranked sixth at maths, the highest of any in Europe. England’s performance has not advanced since tests four years ago. The top places in these rankings are dominated by East Asian countries, such as South Korea and Japan, which are pulling away from their competitors.”(more)

Which country really has the cleverest students?

BBC – Sean Coughlan

“Higher education has a strong sense of hierarchy. And high-profile international league tables are a very public form of this pecking order. While these might measure a whole range of factors – from reputation and staff ratios to research output – what they do not compare is the ability of students who have been taught in these universities. But the OECD has now published test results comparing the ability of graduates in different countries. And it shows a very different map of higher education than the ranking tables, which are dominated by US and UK universities, such as Harvard, MIT, Stanford, Oxford, Cambridge and UCL.”(more)