RSI Corporate - Licensing

Why Even Young Students Benefit From Connecting Globally

KQED News Mind/Shift – Kathy Cassidy

“Some teachers I talk to say they do not have time to connect with other classrooms because they are too busy covering their curriculum. In fact, connecting with others is not an addition to our curriculum. It is not something we do after we have finished our reading and math for the day. It is the way we do our curriculum. From practicing counting by fives or comparing similarities and differences via Skype, to writing for a worldwide audience, to making and sharing videos of social studies concepts on our blogs, we connect and invite the world to learn with us and to help us learn. Although learning from others is a key reason why I continue to connect my classroom online, there are many other reasons as well.” (more)

How to bring global learning to your classroom

E-School News – Susan Tate

“Global citizenship is defined by Kosmos Journal as identifying with being a part of an emerging world community and recognizing the importance of taking part in building this community’s values and practices. As a teacher in a rural school district, in a county where many people never move away for college or jobs, it is important for me to use my travels to inspire my students to empathize with others beyond our county and state. While our young people are increasingly connected with others through technology, these connections are often superficial, which leads to an underdeveloped world view. My goal is to get them excited and curious about the world, and I model what it means to be a global citizen through expeditionary travel.” (more)

Global education rankings to measure tolerance

BBC – Sean Coughlan

“The Pisa tests, which compare teenagers’ ability in reading, maths and science, for the first time are also going to test “global competence”. It’s a significant departure to move from maths puzzles and literacy tests to asking questions about fake news, global warming and racism. The inaugural tests for global competence will take place in about 80 countries next year – and the results are going to be pushed centre-stage in the following round of Pisa rankings.”(more)

Using the U.N.’s Sustainable Development Goals

Edutopia – Jodie Deinhammer

“Each year I start out with the same question for my students: What is the biggest issue you think our world faces, and what can we do to solve it? This challenge-based learning approach allows my students to design our class and focus on real-world issues. With their ideas, we build our class projects together. Students next identify a problem in our own community. We discuss all of their ideas and then look at the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Using this resource, we investigate the problems they identify and compare them to world issues. For example, a few years ago, students decided that childhood obesity was a problem in our community.”(more)

UN warns ‘no progress’ on 260 million missing school places

BBC – Sean Coughlan

“Global pledges to provide education for all young people show little chance of being achieved, according to annual figures from the United Nations. There are 264 million young people without access to school, with few signs of progress, says Unesco. Around the world, almost one in 10 children does not even have access to primary level education. The UN agency says wider access to education would radically reduce poverty and improve security. The annual Global Education Monitoring Report tracks the numbers of young people in school and measures progress in international promises to ensure access to education.”(more)