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Global education rankings to measure tolerance

BBC – Sean Coughlan

“The Pisa tests, which compare teenagers’ ability in reading, maths and science, for the first time are also going to test “global competence”. It’s a significant departure to move from maths puzzles and literacy tests to asking questions about fake news, global warming and racism. The inaugural tests for global competence will take place in about 80 countries next year – and the results are going to be pushed centre-stage in the following round of Pisa rankings.”(more)

Using the U.N.’s Sustainable Development Goals

Edutopia – Jodie Deinhammer

“Each year I start out with the same question for my students: What is the biggest issue you think our world faces, and what can we do to solve it? This challenge-based learning approach allows my students to design our class and focus on real-world issues. With their ideas, we build our class projects together. Students next identify a problem in our own community. We discuss all of their ideas and then look at the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Using this resource, we investigate the problems they identify and compare them to world issues. For example, a few years ago, students decided that childhood obesity was a problem in our community.”(more)

Teachers are nation-builders. Developing countries must invest in them properly

The Guardian – Ziauddin Yousafzai

“When I first began my teaching career in Pakistan 20 years ago, a friend of my father said to me: “We were expecting great things from you, Ziauddin. You could have been a political leader or a police chief, but instead you just became a teacher.” I told the man that if I inspired just one of the children in my class that year to be a leader, one again the next year, and one every year for the rest of my career, I would be very proud of my contribution to our community.”(more)

Educating girls: the key to tackling global poverty

The Guardian – Laura Paddison

“Access to education shouldn’t be determined by a child’s gender, yet 130 million girls globally are out of school and 15 million girls of primary school age will never even enter a classroom. Educating girls gives them the freedom to make decisions to improve their lives, which has deep social implications. Giving girls access to schooling is a central part of eradicating global poverty, according to the World Bank, which says better educated women tend to be healthier, participate more in formal labour markets, have fewer children and marry later. The UN’s sustainable development goals call for gender equality and a quality education for all by 2030.”(more)

How U.S. teens compare with their global peers in financial literacy

CBS News – Aimee Picchi

“With an increasingly complex universe of financial products and services, how are America’s high-school students prepared to manage their money as they enter adulthood? Not all that well, according to a new assessment of financial literacy from the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD). The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) test measures the financial knowledge and skills needed to make the jump from high school to college and on into the workforce. The results raise several red flags given that one in five American teens fail to meet the level to be considered financially literate. By comparison, only about one in 10 Chinese and Russian students fail to meet that benchmark. American teens haven’t improved their scores since 2012. On top of that, teens who continue on to college often must make complex decisions about student loans that can impact their lives for decades. The results should be a wake-up call to the American education system, said Andreas Schleicher, education director of the OECD.”(more)

What Do International Students Think of American Schools?

Education Next – Louis Serino

“In 2001, the Brown Center conducted a first-of-its-kind survey of foreign exchange students, asking kids from abroad who have attended U.S. high schools what they think about U.S. education and their American peers. It quickly became one of the most popular studies in the center’s history. In the 2017 Brown Center Report on American Education, author Tom Loveless replicated the survey, hoping to shed light on what is peculiarly American about American high schools. With these new data, Loveless compares the results, more than a decade apart, with a surprising result: Not much has changed.”(more)