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No fruit juice before age 1, pediatricians say

Medical X-Press – Amy Norton

“Several new recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics may just send toddlers into tantrums. One recommendation is that fruit juice be limited for toddlers and older children, and babies shouldn’t have any at all before their first birthday. Another recommendation is that parents should forgo the beloved sippy cup for their children altogether. The advice is the first update to the AAP’s stance on fruit juice in 16 years.The major change is that fruit juice is discouraged for the first year of life—and not just the first six months, as previously recommended.”(more)

Being more active in school lessons can improve performance in tests

Science Daily – Staff Writer

“Children who take part in lessons which include physical activity show an increase in health-enhancing physical activity and academic performance, according to research carried out by Leeds Beckett University. A team led by Senior Lecturer Andy Daly-Smith evaluated the impact of Tagtiv8 maths lessons on physical activity and maths performance. Children from a primary school in Leeds were randomly allocated to groups; taking part in either a seated classroom lesson or a Tagitv8 active learning lesson.”(more)

Study reveals meeting guidelines on TV time, physical activity and sleep duration lower BMI and body fat in children

Medical X-Press – Staff Writer

“New research presented at this year’s European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Porto, Portugal (17-20) May shows that achieving the guideline amounts of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity is associated with significantly lower BMI and body fat in children. The study was conducted by Dr Peter Katzmarzyk and Dr Amanda Staiano at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA. Excess weight and body fat are known to be risk factors for a range of serious health problems including diabetes, cancers, cardiovascular diseases, and even dementia. There is also increasing evidence that the harmful effects of high levels of adiposity begin to manifest themselves in childhood.”(more)

Follow concussion guidelines, but keep children active

The Seattle Times – The Seattle Times Editorial Board

“NEW research on how young athletes should be treated for concussions on and off the field is welcome news for both parents and coaches. But a Seattle doctor who was on the international research panel that created the 2017 Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sports hopes parents won’t use this information as a reason why their children shouldn’t be playing sports. Dr. Stanley Herring, director of the University of Washington Sports Health and Safety Institute, says exercise is essential to a child’s longterm health. The concussion protocols published last month in the British Journal of Sports Medicine are designed to keep athletes as safe as possible and all youth sports programs should adopt them. But parents also need to keep their kids active.”(more)

Child’s Play Is Good for All of Us

The New York Times – Gretchen Reynolds

“If all of the children who currently are sedentary started exercising every day, societies could save enormous amounts of money in the coming decades and have healthier citizens as a whole, according to a remarkable new study. In the United States alone, we could expect to save more than $120 billion every year in health care and associated expenses.”(more)

Kids’ inactivity rises, creating ‘health care time bomb’

USA Today – Jayne O’Donnell and Joshua Mitchell

“The percent of children aged six to 12 who were physically active three or more times a week had its biggest drop in five years and is now under 25%, new data show. Making matters worse, households with incomes under $50,000 have much higher rates of inactivity than families making more than $75,000 annually, an analysis by the Sports and Fitness Industry Association and PHIT America found. In fact, low income Americans are getting more inactive while high income Americans are becoming more active.”(more)