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Childhood Trauma And Its Lifelong Health Effects More Prevalent Among Minorities

KQED News Mind/Shift – Tara Haelle

“When researchers first discovered a link in the late 1990s between childhood adversity and chronic health problems later in life, the real revelation was how common those experiences were across all socioeconomic groups. But the first major study to focus on adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) was limited to a single healthcare system in San Diego. Now a new study — the largest nationally representative study to date on ACEs — confirms that these experiences are universal, yet highlights some disparities among socioeconomic groups. People with low-income and educational attainment, people of color and people who identified as gay, lesbian or bisexual had significantly higher chance of having experienced adversity in childhood.” (more)

How Internships Connect First Generation College Bound Students to STEM Careers

KQED News Mind/Shift – Joanne Jacobs

“It was not an ordinary lunch period at Downtown College Prep Alum Rock High. Berenice Espino and her Quest for Space teammates had gathered in the engineering classroom to watch as a SpaceX rocket was launched into the atmosphere heading for the International Space Station, carrying onboard a science experiment they’d designed. NASA astronauts would test the device, which analyzes the effects of weightlessness on cooling and heating systems, and send data back to the students.” (more)

Key takeaways from one of the longest-running studies on the impact of early-childhood education

Education Dive – Linda Jacobson

“While Reynolds’ most recent analysis focuses on degree completion, he notes that higher educational attainment is also associated with higher earnings, better mental health and less likelihood of criminal activity. “Given that educational attainment is the leading social determinant of health, findings demonstrate that school-based early childhood programs, such as the CPC program, have significant potential to advance life-course health and well-being,” he writes.” (more)

Despite progress, California’s Latino students still face multiple educational challenges

Education Dive – Linda Jacobson

“Over the past decade, the number of Latino students in California completing an associate or bachelor’s degree has doubled, and the dropout rate among these students has fallen from 27% in 1994 to 13% in 2015. But Latino 3- and 4-year-olds in the state are still far less likely to attend preschool than young white, black and Asian children, and in school, they are more likely to have a less effective teacher, to attend a school without an arts programs to have less access to courses required for admission to the state’s two university systems.”(more)

Reaching 90% Grad Rate Unlikely Without an Acute Focus on Low-Income, Minority Kids, Report Finds

The 71 Million – Mark Keierleber

“As the national high school graduation rate continues to rise — it hit a record 83.2 percent last year — the leaders of a campaign to raise that number to 90 percent by 2020 said Wednesday they fear the country will not meet that goal. Hitting that ambitious target would require a far more intense focus on minority and low-income students, who continue to lag behind. “We’ve got to be real about what the barriers are to success for students,” said John Gomperts, president and CEO of the America’s Promise Alliance.”(more)

Lighting the way for STEM students

The Ventura County Star – Ramon Flores

“I found the biggest issue for young Latina/o students is understanding how to go about getting a college education. With parents who have no knowledge of the labyrinthine world of college and financial aid applications, students with my background struggle to understand how to get into college step-by-step. My inspiration and support came from my parents. Even though my father attended school for only one day before declaring he didn’t like it, he went on to teach himself to read, write and do math. My mother, who worked full-time, would spend her evenings at my high school in Sun Valley learning English. She was a strict taskmaster, making sure I not only got high marks, but the very best possible grades. Their examples gave me the drive to excel. I want to share that passion to succeed in STEM with other young people — especially Latina/os.”(more)