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What Your Students Really Need to Know About Digital Citizenship

Edutopia – Staff Writer

“In my classroom, I use two essential approaches in the digital citizenship curriculum that I teach: proactive knowledge and experiential knowledge… I want my students to know the “9 Key Ps” of digital citizenship. While I go into these Ps in detail in my book Reinventing Writing, here are the basics: 1. Passwords: Do students know how to create a secure password? Do they know that email and online banking should have a higher level of security and never use the same passwords as other sites? Do they have a system like LastPass for managing passwords, or a secure app where they store this information?.”(more)

How to Teach Internet Safety to Younger Elementary Students

Edutopia – Mary Beth Hertz

“A few years ago, I wrote a post called “Teaching Digital Citizenship in the Elementary Classroom.” Now I want to share a sample lesson for teaching internet safety to students as young as kindergarten. Yes, you read correctly—kindergarten. With children spending time online at younger and younger ages, it’s vital that we explicitly teach young children how to protect themselves online. Most young children get the “stranger danger” talk at school, so they know about how to handle strangers in their neighborhood and in face-to-face situations.”(more)

Want to Spy on Your Children? Call It Monitoring…and Get Their Blessing

The Wall Street Journal – Wilson Rothman

“Parents, it’s OK—essential, even—to spy on your children’s internet use. Children are getting smartphones, tablets and iPods at earlier ages, but that doesn’t mean they’re laying low in “ Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood.” Just peek at your child’s browsing history; sometimes elementary schoolers google like teenagers.”(more)

Pupils need internet lessons to thrive online, say Lords

BBC – Judith Burns

“Learning to survive in a world dominated by the internet should be as important for children as reading and writing, says a House of Lords report. Lessons about online responsibilities, risks and acceptable behaviour should be mandatory in all UK schools, the Lords Communications Committee argues. The internet is “hugely beneficial” but children need awareness of its hazards, said committee chairman Lord Best. Industry leaders said education was key to keeping children safe online. The Lords report builds on findings by the Children’s Commissioner for England in January that the internet is not designed for children, despite them being the biggest users by age group. “Children inhabit a world in which every aspect of their lives is mediated through technology: from health to education, from socialising to entertainment. “Yet the recognition that children have different needs to those of adults has not yet been fully accepted in the online world,” say the Lords.”(more)

To Keep Teens Safe Online, They Need To Learn To Manage Risk

KQED News Mind/Shift – April Fulton

“Parents of teens know how tricky it is to keep their kids physically safe while balancing their need for greater independence, but when it comes to keeping them safe online, it can be even trickier. Horror stories of social media harassment and exposure to explicit content leading to teen suicide or even murder abound. With 91 percent of U.S. teens accessing the Internet via a mobile device that allows them to be online anywhere and at all times of day, parents are desperately looking for ways to protect teens from online predators, bullies, and their own poor decisionmaking. Most apps sold to promote teen safety online focus on giving parents control over the phone, rather than helping teens learn how to navigate the web safely, a study finds.”(more)

Secret Teacher: giving students wifi has made lessons chaotic

The Guardian – Secret Teacher

“Our school recently started providing in-school wifi access to pupils. Teaching staff were not privy to the logic – but when the leadership team announced the news in assembly, they were cheered to the rafters by grateful children. The schools grounds have poor phone signal, so logging on through 4G had not been an option, and the internet had only been available through school computers until this point.”(more)