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Most schools don’t teach the skill employers want most: oral communication

Education Dive – Amelia Harper

“Despite an AACU survey released in August listing “good speaking skills” as the top quality employers are seeking, most schools don’t teach oral communication — and when they do, they tend to focus only on academic scenarios rather than teaching the type of communication skills required in most workplace situations, Education Week reports.” (more)

Redefining Education: Preparing Children For A Radically Different World

Forbes – Richard Levick

“Almost everything about our lives has changed in the past couple of generations, much of it with breathtaking speed. The economy has gone global and is now thoroughly dependent on digital technologies, rendering obsolete much of our parents’ world. Trains and planes now travel at three or four times the pace of their predecessors – and they’re much safer than they used to be.” (more)

What does the ‘future of work’ mean for schools? Big claims leave educators with more questions than answers

Chalk Beat – Matt Barnum

“U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos recently told the Wall Street Journal that schools need to change because by the time current kindergarteners reach the job market, 65 percent of jobs will be newly invented. The XQ Initiative to reinvent high school claims that the “jobs of tomorrow will look totally different than those of today or the recent past.” A special report in Education Week on the future of work says that “technological change, globalization, and climate instability are happening at an accelerating pace all across the world.” These warnings of dramatic change are increasingly being used to promote advocates’ favored solutions for improving schools, and the results are trickling down into real classrooms — not just through the expansion of established career and technical education programs, for example, but with calls to upend traditional schooling altogether.” (more)

The STEM crisis: What the growing skills gap means for the economy and where we go from here

The Hill – Dhaval Jadav

“Our government wants businesses to stop outsourcing. It creates incentives to encourage the hiring of American workers. It implements policies to keep jobs and factories here in the U.S. And while these measures are all well-meaning, none of them ultimately tackle what is the greatest threat to our nation’s long-term economic prosperity—the technical skills gap in our workforce. Couple that with restrictions on immigration, and particularly H1-Bs, and we’re on the brink of a talent vacuum here in the U.S.” (more)

Training And Education Beyond The Obsession With STEM

Forbes – Milton Ezrati

“Trade can help alleviate the pressures of this country’s aging demographic by allowing the economy to source labor-intensive products from abroad. It can only work, however, if the United States has something else to sell the world in return. Right now, the country has huge comparative and absolute advantages in producing high-value products. Its workforce is better educated and better trained than those of the emerging economies, where the United States would source its purchases of labor-intensive products. That workforce also has much more capital and technology at its disposal. To carry on this way, the economy will need to sustain these advantages, and that will involve an ever-greater emphasis on training and innovation.” (more)

Technology’s influence reshapes how employers assess job applicants

The Christian Science Monitor – Beth Pinsker

“When companies recruit new workers, particularly for entry-level jobs, they are not necessarily looking for knowledge of certain software. They are looking for what most consider soft skills: problem solving, effective communication, and leadership. They also want candidates who show a willingness to keep learning new skills.” (more)