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Training And Education Beyond The Obsession With STEM

Forbes – Milton Ezrati

“Trade can help alleviate the pressures of this country’s aging demographic by allowing the economy to source labor-intensive products from abroad. It can only work, however, if the United States has something else to sell the world in return. Right now, the country has huge comparative and absolute advantages in producing high-value products. Its workforce is better educated and better trained than those of the emerging economies, where the United States would source its purchases of labor-intensive products. That workforce also has much more capital and technology at its disposal. To carry on this way, the economy will need to sustain these advantages, and that will involve an ever-greater emphasis on training and innovation.” (more)

Technology’s influence reshapes how employers assess job applicants

The Christian Science Monitor – Beth Pinsker

“When companies recruit new workers, particularly for entry-level jobs, they are not necessarily looking for knowledge of certain software. They are looking for what most consider soft skills: problem solving, effective communication, and leadership. They also want candidates who show a willingness to keep learning new skills.” (more)

How do we prepare students for the future? Focus on experiential competencies

Education Dive – Monique Fuchs

” As educators, we constantly evaluate whether our programs and curricula prepare students sufficiently for the current and projected needs of industries. That fact has never been more true as new graduates face a fast-changing workforce and education is now preparing students for jobs that don’t even exist yet.” (more)

‘Reskilling crisis’ emerging as 1.4M U.S. jobs face technology disruption

Education Dive – Naomi Eide

“Referred to as a “reskilling crisis,” only 2% of workers could transition to new jobs if immediately called on to take another position that matched their skill set. Most other workers, however, have few skills required to transition jobs; 16% have no opportunities to transition to new jobs.” (more)

New Economics Paper Shows That High School and College Jobs Leads to Higher Wages Later in Life

The 74 Million – Kevin Mahnken

“The growth of the college wage premium — the added financial benefit accruing to employees with a few years of college education, and especially completed degrees — has slowed since the 1980s, according to a new paper from the National Bureau of Economic Research. Additionally, the study’s authors argue that the effects of holding a job while simultaneously enrolled in high school or college are more beneficial than schooling alone.”(more)

Common sense a prerequisite for brilliance

News Herald – Juliann Talkington

Juliann

Do high standardized test scores assure success?

Many highly-accomplished people had far from perfect scores on the SAT test. Some struggled to get through college and others dropped out. With these results, there must be more to success than academic brilliance.

Granted, technological advances have made academic knowledge, especially in math and the sciences, more important. However, common sense is just as vital as it was fifty years ago. Sadly, many parents have become so focused on academic knowledge and fame that common sense has fallen by the wayside.

Common sense is something most of us understand intuitively, but is difficult to define. It is a combination of wisdom and self-discipline.

According to Wordnik wisdom is, “The ability to discern or judge what is true, right, or lasting.” Wisdom is not something that can be found in a textbook, taught in a classroom, or downloaded from the Internet. It is not tested through standardized tests like the SAT, MCAT, or GRE. Instead it is something that comes with exposure and experience.

The same dictionary defines self-discipline as, “Training and control of one’s conduct.” Self-discipline is generally modeled and taught at home through structure, responsibility, consequences, and praise.

Before the age of helicopter parents, most kids developed common sense as part of everyday life. Children were given considerable responsibility. Parents set expectations and there were consequences for poor choices. Only the winners received trophies. Through the school of hard knocks kids gradually learned how to present ideas, communicate with others, and alert people of delays. They came to understand the importance of punctuality and how to diplomatically address problems.

Now many parents are so worried about the “perfect” D1 sports program, landing a lead movie role, etc. that they do too much of their kids. It is often better to set general extra-curricular involvement requirements and establish minimum effort expectations rather than micromanage.

Finally, it is important for children to take responsibility for their actions. If a child is going to be late, he/she should notify the adult in charge. When a child damages property, he/she needs to earn money for the repair. And when a child performs poorly on a test, he/she needs to get a poor grade rather than have his/her parent negotiate with the principal.

Stepping out of the micromanagement role is challenging. However, it is easier once we realize our children need an environment that fosters common sense to become truly brilliant.