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Not Just for Reading Class Anymore: 5 Tips for Teaching Literacy Across Multiple Subjects

Ed Surge – Mary Jo Madda

“The very first year I taught middle school science, I found myself teaching more reading lessons than I had ever expected—and that didn’t change when I switched to a middle school math classroom two years later. Add in the fact that I had several English language learners in my class, and my lessons on mitochondria and tetrahedrons largely started with basic vocabulary and sentence flow instruction. But looking back, I shouldn’t have been surprised. It’s not just the Language Arts or Reading teacher’s sole responsibility to teach literacy. In fact, teaching literacy is connected to any and every subject—and it’s only getting more necessary as the online and offline worlds become more intertwined.”(more)

Fake news: improved critical literacy skills are key to telling fact from fiction

The Guardian – Jonathan Douglas

“Fake news is a buzzword of our time, but its impact can be significant. Not only can it threaten our democracy, our confidence in governance, or our trust in journalism, but it has also been reported to distort children’s view of the world. In a digital world, we can no longer take everything we read, hear or see at face value – no matter how reliable we believe the source. Children are increasingly likely to encounter fake news; more young people than ever are using digital media as their main source of news, so they must be equipped with the skills to tell fact from fiction.”(more)

Adaptive literacy? 3 must-knows for teachers and admin about adaptive learning

E-School News – Meris Stansbury

“The use of differentiated instruction to individualize each student’s learning experience is becoming more common in today’s elementary classrooms, but creating meaningful differentiation for a typical class of 25 students or more can still be a challenge. What should educators and administrators know about adaptive learning?.”(more)

Students want to spend time in the active, group-learning learning spaces schools are building

The District Administration – Abby Spegman

“Steven Yates has a message for would-be school librarians. “If you’re coming to this because you like to read and you want to manage a collection of books, then you showed up about 30 years too late to the profession,” says Yates, a former high school librarian who teaches in the school library media certification program at the University of Alabama. The school library’s mission—matching resources with those who need them—has not changed, he says. But its role is evolving: With materials increasingly offered online, schools are transforming their libraries into active places for students to work together and get creative, with staff who do much more than manage books.”(more)

How to make math a key part of your ELL curriculum

E-School News – Vinod Lobo

“Historically, English language learner (ELL) instruction has primarily focused on reading and writing. The reasons for this are twofold: 1) Reading and writing are the most obvious, immediate learning needs, and 2) federal and state reclassification requirements are focused on these subjects. Conventional thinking says that literacy must be the primary focus, and that when literacy scores rise, they will pull up math scores alongside them.”(more)

Getting Everyone on the Same Page

Edutopia – Robert Ward

“English teachers are typically literature lovers, so it’s natural for them to share their passion for reading with their students by introducing them to great books. However, some teachers find the prospect of reading and analyzing an entire novel with their classes to be overwhelming or problematic. Their most common concerns center around these questions:.”(more)