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100 Top Colleges Vow To Enroll More Low-Income Students

KQED News Mind/Shift – Elissa Nadworny

“College access and affordability: It’s a common topic in higher education — because college is the one place that can really be a catapult when it comes to moving up the economic ladder. And yet, research has shown that just 3 percent of high-achieving, low-income students attend America’s most selective colleges. And, it’s not that these students just aren’t there — every year tens of thousands of top students who don’t come from wealthy families never even apply to elite colleges.” (more)

Improving children’s access to nature starts with addressing inequality

The Guardian – Anna Leach

“With children now better at identifying Pokémon characters than common species of British plants and wildlife, there are concerns that we are increasingly losing touch with nature. In January, the UK government announced it would set £10m aside for outdoor learning – part of a 25-year environment plan that includes a pledge to “encourage children to be close to nature, in and out of school, with particular focus on disadvantaged areas”. Worries about children becoming disconnected from nature are not new. A 2016 study by Natural England found that more than one in nine children had not set foot in a park, forest or other natural environment over the previous year.” (more)

Gates Foundation moves to implement new strategy to support ‘networks for school improvement’

Ed Source – Louis Freedberg

“Following a speech last October in which Bill Gates announced a major shift in the education priorities and strategy of his foundation, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is moving to implement its plan to invest the biggest share of its education philanthropy dollars in education networks that come up with their own “locally driven solutions” to improve student achievement.” (more)

This Accelerator Empowers Low-Income Students to Jump the College-to-Career Divide

Ed Surge – Aimée Eubanks Davis

” Only one in four of the 1.2 million low-income or first-generation college enrollees each year will graduate and land a strong first job or enter grad school. African American young people, like Jalil, are twice as likely to end up unemployed even with their Bachelor’s degree. The causes stem from a lack of access to career skills, mindsets, experiences and networks. Certain invisible privileges often come to students from more affluent backgrounds—from parents who can help their children put together compelling resumes, to a sibling who’s gone through the interview process just a few years before, to a family friend who works at a thriving company and will make a connection. But for students without such privileges, these stepping stones are absent, and they’re left trying to jump a gap that other young folks quietly glide across.”(more)

Reaching 90% Grad Rate Unlikely Without an Acute Focus on Low-Income, Minority Kids, Report Finds

The 71 Million – Mark Keierleber

“As the national high school graduation rate continues to rise — it hit a record 83.2 percent last year — the leaders of a campaign to raise that number to 90 percent by 2020 said Wednesday they fear the country will not meet that goal. Hitting that ambitious target would require a far more intense focus on minority and low-income students, who continue to lag behind. “We’ve got to be real about what the barriers are to success for students,” said John Gomperts, president and CEO of the America’s Promise Alliance.”(more)

OPINION: The simple steps that encourage young learners to break equity barriers

The Hechinger Report – Philip W.V. Hickman and Stephen M. Smith

“The class of 2028 will, no doubt, have a maze of postsecondary options to help them unlock their dreams and ambitions. Yet while the connection between education and aspiration is intuitive to many, it’s not necessarily so for children — particularly for those who come from low-income households or families with no college education. Students from low-income families enroll in college (immediately after high school) at a rate 30 percentage points lower than that for students from high-income families — and that gap has persisted since 1990. And it’s not for lack of aspirations. The Educational Policy Improvement Center notes that 93 percent of middle-school students aspire to attend college, and yet only 44 percent of those students actually enroll. There is a gap between what students aspire to achieve and what they accomplish.”(more)