RSI Corporate - Licensing

In elementary education, ‘doing science’ rather than just memorizing it

PBS NewsHour – John Tulenko

“The battle over Common Core education standards is playing out across the country, but a new set of requirements for teaching science is creeping into curricula without the same fanfare. Some states are voluntarily adopting the practices, which emphasize more consistent science instruction as well as hands-on experimentation…”(more)

Report urges sustained teacher training to improve science education

EdSource – Theresa Harrington

“Many teachers are not well-prepared to teach the new Next Generation Science Standards, according to new report released Tuesday…California adopted the Next Generation Science Standards in 2013. They are expected to be fully implemented by 2018. “An evolving understanding of how best to teach science, including the NGSS, represents a significant transition in the way science is currently taught in most classrooms and will require most science teachers to alter the way they teach,” the report concluded…To really transform the way science is taught in California and around the country, teachers need sustained professional development throughout their careers…The new science standards have been adopted in 16 states. Like the Common Core State Standards in English language arts and mathematics, the new science standards stress college and career readiness skills, such as critical thinking, reasoning and problem-solving. Similarly, the report outlined key scientific ideas and skills for teachers that will enable them to effectively implement the standards.”(more)

Science resource targets K-5 STEM gap, NGSS

E-School News – Laura Devaney

” new science resource launching this month is intended to engage K-5 students in problem-based science learning. The curriculum also integrates literacy with science and engineering teaching practices. Inspire Science, from McGraw-Hill Education, is a new core elementary science curriculum for K-5 students designed specifically to address the requirements of the Next Generation Science Standards.”(more)

What to Know About the Next Generation Science Standards

Time – Brian Witte

“The United States may one day play a central role in opening the door to a scientific revolution, but to do so would require a sophisticated method of educating our students about science. The Next Generation Science Standards (or NGSS) represent one such attempt to bring K­12 science education into the 21st century…here are four things every student should know about the Next Generation Science Standards:”(more)

Next Generation Science Standards Get Mixed Reviews From Genetics Experts

Education Week – Liana Heitin

“The Next Generation Science Standards do a better job overall of covering genetics than most previous state standards, but are missing some key content, according to a new study by science education specialists at the American Society of Human Genetics…The study, which was published last week in PLOS ONE, found that the NGSS adequately address 10 of the 19 core genetics concepts. That represents a significant improvement over previous state standards, which on average adequately address only five of the 19 core genetics concepts, according to the study. But the NGSS also left out some key concepts altogether, the study says.”(more)

Arkansas Becomes 14th State to Adopt Next Generation Science Standards

Education Week – Liana Heitin

“With much support from educators, Arkansas has joined 13 states and the District of Columbia in adopting the Next Generation Science Standards. The state board voted unanimously June 11 to adopt the K-8 portion of the science standards with some Arkansas-specific additions and clarifications…Prior to the adoption, the education department conducted several surveys of teachers and administrators and reached out for public comments on the draft. “Every time, over 80 percent of the field was very accepting of the standards, the process, and using the Next Generation Science Standards for the Arkansas science standards,” said Michele Snyder, a science specialist at the Arkansas education department.”(more)