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The top 5 cybersecurity threats for schools

E-School News – Earl D. Lang

“You’d be hard-pressed today to find a school that doesn’t consider safety a high priority. We go to great lengths to keep those inside school walls safe, running drills and spreading awareness in case of threat. There’s one kind of threat schools often overlook when it comes to safety, however, and that’s cyber attack. Cybersecurity isn’t a new concern by any means—it’s just one that’s taken many schools quite a long time to develop a safety plan. With recent ransomware attacks like WannaCry and Petya, the potential theft and leakage of data, particularly confidential information, should be on the minds of all school leaders.”(more)

What Your Students Really Need to Know About Digital Citizenship

Edutopia – Staff Writer

“In my classroom, I use two essential approaches in the digital citizenship curriculum that I teach: proactive knowledge and experiential knowledge… I want my students to know the “9 Key Ps” of digital citizenship. While I go into these Ps in detail in my book Reinventing Writing, here are the basics: 1. Passwords: Do students know how to create a secure password? Do they know that email and online banking should have a higher level of security and never use the same passwords as other sites? Do they have a system like LastPass for managing passwords, or a secure app where they store this information?.”(more)

How to Teach Internet Safety to Younger Elementary Students

Edutopia – Mary Beth Hertz

“A few years ago, I wrote a post called “Teaching Digital Citizenship in the Elementary Classroom.” Now I want to share a sample lesson for teaching internet safety to students as young as kindergarten. Yes, you read correctly—kindergarten. With children spending time online at younger and younger ages, it’s vital that we explicitly teach young children how to protect themselves online. Most young children get the “stranger danger” talk at school, so they know about how to handle strangers in their neighborhood and in face-to-face situations.”(more)

Pupils need internet lessons to thrive online, say Lords

BBC – Judith Burns

“Learning to survive in a world dominated by the internet should be as important for children as reading and writing, says a House of Lords report. Lessons about online responsibilities, risks and acceptable behaviour should be mandatory in all UK schools, the Lords Communications Committee argues. The internet is “hugely beneficial” but children need awareness of its hazards, said committee chairman Lord Best. Industry leaders said education was key to keeping children safe online. The Lords report builds on findings by the Children’s Commissioner for England in January that the internet is not designed for children, despite them being the biggest users by age group. “Children inhabit a world in which every aspect of their lives is mediated through technology: from health to education, from socialising to entertainment. “Yet the recognition that children have different needs to those of adults has not yet been fully accepted in the online world,” say the Lords.”(more)

To Keep Teens Safe Online, They Need To Learn To Manage Risk

KQED News Mind/Shift – April Fulton

“Parents of teens know how tricky it is to keep their kids physically safe while balancing their need for greater independence, but when it comes to keeping them safe online, it can be even trickier. Horror stories of social media harassment and exposure to explicit content leading to teen suicide or even murder abound. With 91 percent of U.S. teens accessing the Internet via a mobile device that allows them to be online anywhere and at all times of day, parents are desperately looking for ways to protect teens from online predators, bullies, and their own poor decisionmaking. Most apps sold to promote teen safety online focus on giving parents control over the phone, rather than helping teens learn how to navigate the web safely, a study finds.”(more)

Teach your kids to use media in healthy ways

Medical X-Press – Staff Writer

“Some pediatric health experts may have loosened the reins a bit on “screen time” for the youngest of children, but that doesn’t mean parents should rely on electronic devices as babysitters, one pediatrician says. “Most of us use media every day. It’s how we interact with the world and it’s how we learn new ideas,” said Dr. Sara Lee, who’s with University Hospitals Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital in Cleveland. “Children will need to know how to use these forms in healthy, effective ways,” Lee said in a hospital news release. New guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) “give parents a lot more guidance on how to use media with their kids at home,” she added. In the new screen-time guidelines for children, the AAP admitted there are notable benefits associated with educational shows or apps, and connecting with friends and loved ones online, Lee said.”(more)