RSI Corporate - Licensing

Navigating Confrontations With Parents

Edutopia – Lori Desautels

“Human brains are social organs—they’re neurobiologically wired for connection. But just as our students’ brains can be adversely affected by negative dispositions, adversities, and behaviors, so can their parents’ brains, affecting relationships with teachers. What feels oppositional and hurtful from a parent could be an exhausted brain, one that is trying to survive and so is defending itself and paying close attention to experiences or relationships that may feel threatening or unsafe.” (more)

Nine Things To Know About Saving For Education

Forbes – Roxana Maddahi

“The cost of college increases by approximately 8% per year on average, making the financial burden terrifying. The average cost of a four-year private university today is $34,740. Based on those numbers, tuition at a private university could cost kids born today well over $100,000 a year.” (more)

Commentary: Parents Read to Their Kids. Why Not Do Math Together? New Project Looks to Promote Family Math — and Help Close the Achievement Gap

The 74 Million – Kelly James and Brian Carter and Kimberly Brenneman and LiLi Liu and Kassie Davis and Cornelia Grumman and Victoria Manning

““I’m just not a math person.” We’ve all heard that phrase from friends, family, or colleagues. Though usually presented as a harmless personality quirk, it conceals math anxiety, insecurity, and potentially a belief that math isn’t as valuable as other areas of study. This has real implications: Research shows that merely expressing math anxiety can damage math performance. Yet we rarely hear people say they’re not a “reading person.” Why is reading viewed differently than math in this way? One reason is that most people don’t know how to support math skill development in young children. This affects low-income children and children of color the most. Fewer than 10 percent of children from low-income families can count to 20 in preschool — a skill that correlates strongly to math achievement in first grade. This contributes to significant racial and socioeconomic math gaps before students enter kindergarten.” (more)

Financial intelligence as important as IQ

News Herald – Juliann Talkington

Juliann

The latest Center for Microeconomic Data Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit revealed that total American household debt reached $13.15 trillion in the fourth quarter of 2017.

In addition, a recent bankrate.com survey suggests six in 10 Americans (61%) don’t have enough savings to cover a $1,000 emergency and four in 10 (39%) have nothing in their savings accounts.

At first glance, it is difficult to understand how so many Americans can be in such poor financial shape. After all, making wise money decisions does not require proficiency in particle physics or an understanding of Shakespeare.

The biggest challenges appear to be intense peer and marketing pressures. If friends and marketers can create this type of havoc in our personal lives, it is imperative that we make sure our children are aware of the pressures and have the tools to make wise financial choices.

Some of the key concepts and teaching ideas are:

Money is limited. Give your child a fixed amount of money. If he/she spends it all on candy near the store entrance, he/she will not have money to purchase a doll or toy truck a few rows back.

Money is earned. Rather than giving a child an allowance, issue money based on successful execution of tasks – emptying the dishwasher, mowing the lawn, folding the laundry, etc.

Spending beyond your means comes at a cost. Credit card companies are VERY good at marketing. It is critical for kids to understand that marketers play on their desire for immediate gratification. Whenever you spend money you do not have you are charged extra money. For example, if you put $100 on a credit card for a year, you will have to repay about $115.

Saving makes sense. Kids need to understand compounding. The sooner you start saving the more the money will grow. If you save $1000 this year and make 5% you will have $1050 at the end of the year. If you make 5% the following year, you will have $1102.50.

Cheapest is not always the lowest cost. Remind your child that there are more than immediate costs. If the $15 shirt falls apart in the wash after the first month, it would be less expensive to buy a $25 shirt that lasts a year.

Even though teaching children financial responsibility may seem overwhelming, it is imperative that children are aware of the marketing and peer pressures they will face and are empowered to make wise decisions with their money.

How To Talk With Kids About Terrible Things

NPR – Cory Turner

“For the more than 3,000 students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, Wednesday’s mass shooting was terrifying and life-changing. But what of the tens of millions of other children, in schools across the country, who have since heard about what happened and now struggle with their own feelings of fear, confusion and uncertainty? For their parents and teachers, we’ve put together a quick primer with help from the National Association of School Psychologists and Melissa Reeves, a former NASP president and co-author of its PREPaRE School Crisis Prevention and Intervention curriculum.” (more)

Back-and-forth exchanges boost children’s brain response to language

Medical X-Press – Anne Trafton

“A landmark 1995 study found that children from higher-income families hear about 30 million more words during their first three years of life than children from lower-income families. This “30-million-word gap” correlates with significant differences in tests of vocabulary, language development, and reading comprehension. MIT cognitive scientists have now found that conversation between an adult and a child appears to change the child’s brain, and that this back-and-forth conversation is actually more critical to language development than the word gap.” (more)