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Bad news, math-averse parents: It rubs off on your kids

The Chicago Tribune – Heidi Stevens

“With a new school year officially underway, experts in numeracy (like literacy, but with numbers) have an important message for math-averse parents: Your anxiety is contagious. Our anxiety, I should say, is contagious. (I count myself among the math-averse.) Research shows that our seemingly benign statements about math (“I never liked this stuff,” “This never made any sense to me”) rub off on our children and do lasting harm.”(more)

What Do Parents Want From Schools?

Edutopia – Ann O’Brien

“Several recent polls have asked adult members of families their thoughts about education. Media coverage of such polls focuses mostly on findings around school choice. But when we dig deeper, we see an array of information that can be helpful to all school leaders and educators.”(more)

Have Math Anxiety? Here’s How to Not Pass It Down to Your Kid

Life Hacker – Michelle Woo

“All over Facebook, I see parents agonizing—and commiserating—over their kids’ homework, particularly their math homework. I’m not there yet, as my daughter is only 4, but I’ve been dreading this stage—I’ve already called “Not it!” to my husband on the decision of who will help her with all things mathematical. (I’ll instead claim English and, hmm, maybe pottery.) But it may be time to shift my attitude. It turns out that parents’ fear of math can be passed along to our kids without us realizing it. Many adults have had a point (or several) in their lives when they declared themselves “not a math person,” and that’s understandable.”(more)

Toddlers’ language development can predict later ability

Medical X-Press – Staff Writer

“A team of researchers, led by Professor James Law from the School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences, looked at the existing evidence to find out which interventions have the greatest potential for boosting toddlers’ language skills and reducing inequalities in outcomes. They also summarised the existing literature on language development. The report, published this week, was commissioned by the Education Endowment Foundation (EEF) in partnership with Public Health England.”(more)

Reading to your children: a special time to learn

The Daily Extra – Lydia Olsen

“We all can remember those special times when a story was read to us, whether at home by somebody we love, at school, or maybe at the library. The story came to life, and we were enthralled with the words. The magic of story reading is a powerful tool. At least 55 percent of Utah’s parents read to their children ages 0-5 everyday compared to 47.9 percent of the nation, according to a survey conducted by the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention National Center of Health Statistics. Why does reading aloud matter so much? Those children in the 55 percent of Utah families who are read to daily are developing literacy skills and language awareness. They have larger vocabularies, which at age 3 is a large predictor of language skill and reading comprehension for ages 9 and 10. But the benefits of reading aloud aren’t just linguistic; spending that time together can also build relationships between parents and children.”(more)

Screen children with reading difficulties for hearing problems, says report

Medical X-Press – Staff Writer

“Children with reading difficulties should be more thoroughly screened for hearing problems, a new report by Coventry University academics has said. The study, funded by the Nuffield Foundation, found 25 per cent of its young participants who had reading difficulties showed mild or moderate hearing impairment, of which their parents and teachers were unaware. The researchers believe that if there was more awareness of youngsters’ hearing problems – as well as an understanding of what particular aspects of literacy they struggled with – then the children might be able to receive more structured support that could help them improve their reading and writing skills.”(more)