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Young children use physics, not previous rewards, to learn about tools

Medical X-Press – Staff Writer

“The findings of the study, based on the Aesop’s fable The Crow and the Pitcher, help solve a debate about whether children learning to use tools are genuinely learning about physical causation or are just driven by what action previously led to a treat. Learning about causality – about the physical rules that govern the world around us – is a crucial part of our cognitive development. From our observations and the outcome of our own actions, we build an idea – a model – of which tools are functional for particular jobs, and which are not.” (more)

Santa Claus and Newton’s Three Laws of Motion

Education World – Leigh O. Cody

“Provide the following scenarios to students. You might cut and paste the text below and present the text to students as a work sheet. Directions: Identify which of Newton’s Laws of Motion is being demonstrated in each of the following scenarios:.”(more)

Can Hot Wheels Change the Way We Teach STEM?

Education Next – Morgan S. Polikoff

“Curriculum and standards are key research topics for Morgan Polikoff, a University of Southern California professor and FutureEd senior fellow. So when Mattel’s philanthropic arm approached him and his research partners about developing curriculum to teach science standards using Mattel’s Hot Wheels cars and tracks, they were in. The researchers developed a hands-on curriculum and professional development lessons teaching basic physics using the popular toys, then conducted a randomized controlled trial in about 60 fourth-grade classrooms in a California school district comparing student learning under the project-based and traditional textbook based instruction over three weeks. FutureEd recently talked with Polikoff about the project, known as Speedometry.”(more)

Ask 4 Questions to Choose an AP Physics Class

The U.S. News and World Report – Brian Witte

“Students considering an Advanced Placement course in physics have four options to choose from: AP Physics 1, AP Physics 2, AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism and AP Physics C: Mechanics. Each end-of-year exam – and potential college credit – corresponds to an AP class, but students may not know how to select the appropriate course and test. AP Physics 1, which is algebra-based, covers Newtonian mechanics, as well as the basics of circuits and mechanical waves. AP Physics 2, which is also algebra-based, continues with electricity and magnetism, fluids, optics and thermodynamics. Both classes and exams emphasize logic and reasoning with an overall goal of students understanding the core concepts of physics, although doing well requires basic algebra.”(more)

Why you should include simulations in your STEM lessons

E-School News – Bree Barnett Dreyfuss

“During my first year of teaching, a mentor teacher showed me interactive PhET simulations, and it changed my curriculum forever. To be honest, I was blown away by their versatility. Since then, I have implemented the use of many simulations in my Physics, Conceptual Physics, and Physical Science classes. Here are six different ways that I use simulations in my classroom.”(more)

Was Albert Einstein really a bad student who failed math?

The Washington Post – Valerie Strauss

“There is huge news in the science world: Scientists just announced that they have detected gravitational waves from the merging of two black holes in deep space — something predicted a century ago by Albert Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity. The finding serves to underscore — again — the prodigious genius of Einstein, a theoretical physicist whose work fundamentally changed the way humans view and understand their world…There are also commonly held aspects of his childhood and education that seem to conflict with the broad genius that he was. That he was a lazy child. That he was a bad student who flunked math. That he had a learning disability. How much of this is true?”(more)