RSI Corporate - Licensing

Playgrounds aren’t always all fun and games

Medical X-Press – Staff Writer

“Playgrounds are supposed to be fun. But rusty bars, litter and poorly maintained equipment can make these seemingly kid-friendly zones downright dangerous, according to a group of emergency medicine physicians. More than 200,000 children are treated in the emergency department each year for playground-related injuries—a dramatic increase in recent years, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says. And about 20,000 of those children get treated for a traumatic brain injury, including concussion, every year. Kids can also break a bone, or even develop internal bleeding due to accidents that occur on a playground.”(more)

Fidget toys polarize schools

The Star – Erin Silver

“Melissa Ferry is a big believer in the benefits of allowing students to use fidget toys in the classroom. She points to research indicating that playing with fidget toys — little gadgets, cubes, putties and spinners — is effective in improving concentration and focus in students with ADHD. She also has seven years’ worth of anecdotal evidence that shows how beneficial they can be for some children.”(more)

Participate in Play: Transform Your Artmaking and Art Teaching

Education World – Danielle Dravenstadt

“Give a child a mound of cold, squishy clay, and suddenly a world of shapes, textures, characters, stories, experiments, and inventions will soon be revealed. This is what I witnessed when I first gave my kindergarten art students Play-Doh, and what I see each time I allow my students to make art in this medium more often associated with the playroom than the classroom. What I first expected to be light activity now leads my students to serious investigations of what familiar materials can represent and opened my eyes to the profound thinking and learning that takes place when children play.”(more)

More risks on school playgrounds linked to happier children

Medical X-Press – Staff Writer

“Children from schools with greater risk and challenge in the playground environment report being happier at school and playing with more children, according to a study published online April 24 in Pediatrics. Victoria L. Farmer, Ph.D., from the University of Otago in New Zealand, and colleagues conducted a two-year cluster-randomized controlled trial in which eight control schools were asked to not change their play environment, while eight intervention schools increased opportunities for risk and challenge (e.g., rough-and-tumble play), reduced rules, and added loose parts (e.g., tires). At baseline, one year, and two years, 840 children, 635 parents, and 90 teachers completed bullying questionnaires.”(more)

How Kids Learn Better By Taking Frequent Breaks Throughout The Day

KQED News Mind/Shift – Timothy D. Walker

“Although I favor the Finnish model, I realize that unleashing fifth graders on the playground every hour would be a huge shift for most schools. According to Pellegrini, breaks don’t have to be held outdoors to be beneficial. In one of his experiments at a public elementary school, the children had their recess times inside the school, and the results matched those of other experiments where they took their breaks outside: after their breaks, the students were more focused in class (Pellegrini, 2005).”(more)

How Play Is At The Heart of Many World-Changing Inventions

KQED News Mind/Shift – Katrina Schwartz

“Though we speak our own language all the time, we don’t tend to notice how it works until we learn another one. Until then, we lack the necessary perspective: As the German poet Goethe said, “Those who know nothing of foreign languages know nothing of their own.” When we learn a second language, all the “decisions” our language invisibly makes for us becomes visible. We notice how our way of describing the world is just one of many, and that there is a dazzling variety of ways in which we could see the world if we had the language to do so.”(more)