RSI Corporate - Licensing

New research underscores the importance of language development in low-income, high-risk children

Medical X-Press – Staff Writer

“Language sets the stage for how children grow, develop, and learn. University of Miami Assistant Professor of Psychology Lynn Perry, whose research focuses on language and cognitive development in children, says a child’s early years of language development are critical for the fundamentals of school readiness, such as literacy skills and social and emotional growth. In a recent study published in the journal PLOS One, Perry and a team of fellow researchers who examined child speech interactions over the course of a year at the UM Linda Ray Intervention Center found that vulnerable children benefit from conversations with their peers and their teachers.” (more)

How to Boost Math Skills in the Early Grades

KQED News Mind/Shift – Sarah Gonser

“In the last decade, educators have focused on boosting literacy skills among low-income kids in the hope that all children will read well by third grade. But the early-grade math skills of these same low-income children have not received equal attention. Researchers say many high-poverty kindergarten classrooms don’t teach enough math and the few lessons on the subject are often too basic. While instruction may challenge kids with no previous exposure to math, it is often not engaging enough for the growing number of kindergarteners with some math skills.” (more)

Child poverty drops in California, but is still the nation’s highest

Ed Source – Carolyn Jones

“California’s booming economy has led to a slight drop in the child poverty rate, but the state still has the highest rate in the country when the cost of living is taken into account, according to new data released by Kidsdata and the Public Policy Institute of California. An average of 22.8 percent — or 2 million — of California’s children lived below the poverty threshold in 2013-15, which is $30,000 a year for a family of four, according to the data released this week. The number is down from 24.4 percent in 2011-13.” (more)

Helping High-Ability Kids from Disadvantaged Backgrounds in 2018

Education Next – Chester E. Finn, Jr.

“If Jane Smith in Arkansas invented a method to ensure the success of rural English language learners, would John Jones in rural Wyoming ever learn about it? For almost every issue that confronts us about how to improve education, somewhere there is a success story to be told and lessons from which others can benefit. However, there are two problems in need of urgent attention. First, successful work is rarely documented, evaluated and published — anywhere! That’s why Jones’ students in Wyoming would have little chance of benefiting from Smith’s solution in Arkansas. Second, we lack a means of assembling the information that does exist in a coherent and accessible fashion.”(more)

Low-income children missing out on language learning both at home and at school

Science Daily – Staff Writer

“Children from poor neighborhoods are less likely to have complex language building opportunities both in home and at school, putting them at a disadvantage in their kindergarten year, finds a new study led by NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. The findings, published in the Journal of Educational Psychology, suggest that language learning should involve both families and teachers in order to overcome these early disadvantages and ensure learning opportunities for vulnerable students.”(more)

A Growth Mindset Could Buffer Kids From Negative Academic Effects of Poverty

KQED News Mind/Shift – Katrina Schwartz

“Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck, along with other education researchers interested in growth mindset, have done numerous studies showing that when students believe their intelligence can grow and change with effort, they perform better on academic tests. These findings have sparked interest and debate about how to encourage a growth mindset in students both at home and at school. Now, a national study of tenth-graders in Chile found student mindsets are correlated to achievement on language and math tests. And students from low-income families were less likely to hold a growth mindset than their more affluent peers. However, if a low-income student did have a growth mindset, it worked as a buffer against the negative effects of poverty on achievement.”(more)