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This is what Gen Z-designed curriculum looks like for the future

E-School News – Darren Faust

“The generation in school now is the first generation raised entirely in the Age of Technology. They are digital natives, many of them using computers, smartphones, and other digital tools nearly from birth. As technology continues to grow and expand, so too will the ways we use it. This growth and expansion will impact the types of jobs that will be available in the next 10–20 years. So how do we as educators prepare Gen Z for jobs that may not even exist yet?.”(more)

Teach ‘problem solving’ to produce engineers, schools urged

BBC – Judith Burns

“A focus on “playful experimentation” could boost learning throughout UK schools, says the Royal Academy of Engineering. It could also instil a passion for engineering and help “overcome our current lack of engineers”, it adds. Ministers say they want the UK to be world beating for science, technology, engineering and maths (Stem) subjects. But co-author Prof Bill Lucas, of Winchester University, said schools “must rethink” the way they teach in order to boost engagement in engineering. The report also urges professional engineers to dedicate some of their time to working with pupils and teachers in schools.”(more)

What Preschoolers Need From Adults

Education Week – Kate Stoltzfus

“Christakis, whose career has focused on the well-being of children and their families, published The Importance of Being Little: What Young Children Really Need From Grownups last year. In the book, she argues for a rethinking of the purpose of preschool and proposes several changes to preschool curricula. According to Christakis, chief among early-childhood education’s current problems is that it neglects the role of play in learning. She recommends that preschools devote more time to cultivating children’s imaginations, instead of focusing on test preparation and the recall of numbers and letters. The Importance of Being Little also explains that educators and parents would do well to re-examine their mindsets on the teaching of young children by recognizing their preschoolers’ capacity for problem-solving, deeper learning, and forming relationships.”(more)

Can robotics teach problem solving to students?

E-School News – Beth Brubaker

“Throughout my 35 years of teaching, I’ve watched students grow up in what I lovingly call the “worksheet generation.” In this environment, students are accustomed to a very structured style of learning, where they are handed a worksheet, then asked to turn to page five in their math book and solve problems one through 15. This approach, however, often teaches students there is only one right answer and limits meaningful engagement and creativity. My teaching experience has taught me that it is no longer possible to prepare students with the 21st century skills they will need for the workforce without moving away from this paint-by-numbers approach.”(more)

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Through STEM

STEM Champ – Staff Writer

“21st century life is one that is characterized by fast paced developments in technology, which influences every aspect of our lives. Therefore technological expertise is without doubt the most desirable skill for future careers. But apart from ensuring competence in STEM careers, STEM learning also ensures the development of certain 21st century life skills that are required by the growing generation to face the world. In the increasingly competitive world of this century, it is necessary that our children be equipped with the prowess to deal with the competition and meet the needs of the time. STEM education teaches these skills to students, leaving them ready and capable to face the world. Reasoning, systems thinking, decision making, critical thinking and problem solving are some of the most significant 21st century skills required by children. Critical thinking and problem solving are skills that students need to develop in need to be able to face the world outside the classroom.”(more)

Push problem solving in STEM education

The Grand Rapids Business Journal – Joy Ducey

“STEM — ever heard of it? I am guessing you have. The acronym for science, technology, engineering and mathematics is being funded and promoted at the federal level — and for good reason. As our world continues to become more complex, it is critical that we have the knowledge, skills and abilities to solve tough problems. By studying science, technology, engineering and math, we develop these skills.”(more)